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8 Reasons Why Mindhunter is the Best Original Series on Netflix for 2017

Charmaine Blake

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8 Reasons Why Mindhunter is the Best Original Series on Netflix for 2017

8 Reasons Why Mindhunter is the Best Original Series on Netflix for 2017

On October’s Friday the 13th, Netflix and director David Fincher (Gone Girl, Seven, Fight Club) released a new and original psychological series, Mindhunter, focused on exploring not only the minds of some of America’s worst serial killers, but also the history of how the FBI finally incorporated psychology into their criminal investigations. Set in the 1970s, and based on real-life serial killers and the FBI agents who interviewed them in order to understand the psyche of a killer, Mindhunter mixes fact with fiction to deliver a stellar, fascinating, and intense drama. There are a few reasons why this is Netflix’s must-see original series of 2017.

David Fincher

David Fincher is known for his stylistic approach to films and projects that explore character and psychology above all else. He has taken audiences into the minds of the most disturbed and wonderfully imperfect, complex characters, and Mindhunter is no different. In an interview with Collider, Fincher explained that he wanted to explore the reality that serial killers are “real, sad people,” and that the reason we are so fascinated by them is because “we’re nothing like them.”

Real-Life Serial Killers

History buffs and true crime fans will appreciate the factual elements of the show, which is based on a book, Mindhunter: Inside the FBI’s Elite Serial Crime Unit, by real-life FBI agent John Douglas, who worked for the FBI Investigative Support Unit for 25 years. The book provides a look into real criminals and serial killers that were psychologically profiled by Douglas, who has an incredible ability to get into the minds of the killers in order to create profiles for each of them that help to explain their habits. His experience in interviewing and studying these individuals, including Charles Manson and Ed Gein, established a framework for getting into the minds of the most disturbed perpetrators in the United States.

The main character of the series, Holden Ford, is based on Douglas, but the fictionalized part of the series is mainly the narrative that occurs in Ford’s personal life with his girlfriend, Debbie (Hannah Gross), as well as the personal lives of his partner, Bill Tench (based on real-life FBI agent Robert Ressler) and Dr. Wendy Carr (based on real-life Dr. Ann Burgess). Their work on creating a system of serial killer profiling based on patterns in habits and psychology, however, is real enough, as is the criminals themselves. The real names of the serial killers that are interviewed and studied in the series are used, as well as their likenesses. The crimes of these killers, including Ed Kemper and Jerome Brudos, that appear in the show are also accurate. Mindhunter even used some dialogue from real video interviews with, for example, Kemper, the “Co-ed Killer,” in scenes in the show.

Holden Ford

Jonathan Groff’s captivating performance as Agent Holden Ford, the man determined to master the mind of a serial killer, is reason enough to watch Fincher’s new series. What makes Ford so interesting is the mystery behind his personality. At times you’re on this journey with him, experiencing his wonder and subtle horror while hanging on every word that comes out of a serial killer’s mouth.

Most of the time, though, Ford’s emotions are well hidden; so much so, in fact, that you will find yourself wondering whether or not Ford could be diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder like the killers interviewed in the show. Ford seems disgusted with the actions of some of the killers, but he also appears desensitized at times. He’s not afraid to break laws or rules to reach his goals, and Ford doesn’t usually show that he has any remorse for his actions when they cause turmoil.

With that being said, Ford isn’t entirely emotionless or heartless. What you come to figure out while watching his character over the ten-episode first season, is his ability to compartmentalize, as well as the negative side effects of immersing yourself so deeply into a serial killer’s mind. His relationships slowly begin to crumble throughout the season, and it all stems from his interactions during his in-person interviews with those serial killers, though he doesn’t seem to realize it’s happening until the season finale.

One of the best moments of the first season comes in the finale episode, when Ford’s walls are shattered in a moment of pure panic and fear, and the audience realizes how tightly his emotions have been buried underneath a relentlessly logical, determined, stubborn exterior, that has been slightly influenced by the darkness he surrounds himself with. Ford having to face the reality of what can happen to you when you delve too far into a serial killer’s mind and perspective is a powerful moment, and arguably the most revealing scene of Ford’s character.

The Behavioral Science Unit

The best part about Mindhunter is the relationship between Agents Ford and Bill Tench (Holt McCallanay). The two make a great serial killer investigating duo, their respective intelligence, personalities, and age difference providing a great balance and realistic partnership that also provides a bit of comedic relief at times.

Real-life FBI Agents Douglas and Ressler were actually the ones who initially coined the term “serial killer” in the first place, and their series counterparts Ford and Tench, with the help of Dr. Carr (Anna Torv), are seen perfecting the terminology the FBI and other law enforcement agencies still use today. This includes the established vernacular of grouping certain offenders into either “organized” or “disorganized” categories. In reality, trailblazer Dr. Burgess, who Carr is based on, didn’t join the team until after she established her expertise and pioneered “the treatment of trauma and abuse victims.”

Carr’s presence on the team in the show, however, creates another perspective that is refreshing and necessary for the audience. Carr brings a certain morality and organization to the group, meaning she sometimes finds herself in confrontation with the improvisational Ford on how the interviews with the serial killers should be handled. When the two characters clash, it brings up an interesting question: How far is too far when trying to understand or catch a serial killer? (Click link below to view the rest of this story)

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Private Life Netflix Movie Trailer

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The new film from Academy Award-nominated filmmaker Tamara Jenkins (The Savages, Slums of Beverly Hills), PRIVATE LIFE is the bracingly funny and moving story of Richard (Academy Award-nominee Paul Giamatti) and Rachel (Kathryn Hahn), a couple in the throes of infertility who try to maintain their marriage as they descend deeper and deeper into the insular world of assisted reproduction and domestic adoption. After the emotional and economic upheaval of in vitro fertilization, they’re at the end of their middle-aged rope, but when Sadie (breakout newcomer Kayli Carter), a recent college drop out, re-enters their life, things begin to look up.

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Netflix’s spooky ‘Sabrina’ trailer is nothing like the ’90s sitcom you remember

Charmaine Blake

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If you’re a fan of the sitcom Sabrina the Teenage Witch…Netflix’s Chilling Adventures of Sabrina may not be for you.

The first trailer for this dark take on the powerful teen (from the makers of Riverdale) promises creepy woods, minotaurs, the occult, and a terrifying cover of “Happy Birthday.” And it’s just a teaser!

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina stars Kiernan Shipka (Mad Men), whose half-human half-witch identity clashes along with the magical and mortal worlds. A far cry from its ’90s cousin, Netflix describes CAOS as “tonally in the vein of Rosemary’s Baby and The Exorcist.” So…no animatronic cat?

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina hits Netflix Oct. 26.

Read more: https://mashable.com/video/netflix-sabrina-teaser/

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Netflix’s Quincy Jones documentary drops trailer with too many legendary stars to count

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“Quincy Jones has too many awards, accolades, and accomplishments to list.

And the legendary musician and film producer’s upcoming Netflix documentary, directed by his own daughter Rashida Jones, features almost as many stars.

The trailer for Quincy shines a spotlight on the influence he had on some of the most talented people in the entire entertainment industry: Oprah Winfrey, Kendrick Lamar, Will Smith, Lady Gaga. And we heard a little Barack Obama moment in there too.

But the doc appears to focus on his life both before and after becoming the iconic Quincy Jones.

You can catch it on Netflix Sept. 21.”

Read more: https://mashable.com/video/netflix-documentary-quincy-jones-trailer/

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