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8 Reasons Why Mindhunter is the Best Original Series on Netflix for 2017

Charmaine Blake

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8 Reasons Why Mindhunter is the Best Original Series on Netflix for 2017

8 Reasons Why Mindhunter is the Best Original Series on Netflix for 2017

On October’s Friday the 13th, Netflix and director David Fincher (Gone Girl, Seven, Fight Club) released a new and original psychological series, Mindhunter, focused on exploring not only the minds of some of America’s worst serial killers, but also the history of how the FBI finally incorporated psychology into their criminal investigations. Set in the 1970s, and based on real-life serial killers and the FBI agents who interviewed them in order to understand the psyche of a killer, Mindhunter mixes fact with fiction to deliver a stellar, fascinating, and intense drama. There are a few reasons why this is Netflix’s must-see original series of 2017.

David Fincher

David Fincher is known for his stylistic approach to films and projects that explore character and psychology above all else. He has taken audiences into the minds of the most disturbed and wonderfully imperfect, complex characters, and Mindhunter is no different. In an interview with Collider, Fincher explained that he wanted to explore the reality that serial killers are “real, sad people,” and that the reason we are so fascinated by them is because “we’re nothing like them.”

Real-Life Serial Killers

History buffs and true crime fans will appreciate the factual elements of the show, which is based on a book, Mindhunter: Inside the FBI’s Elite Serial Crime Unit, by real-life FBI agent John Douglas, who worked for the FBI Investigative Support Unit for 25 years. The book provides a look into real criminals and serial killers that were psychologically profiled by Douglas, who has an incredible ability to get into the minds of the killers in order to create profiles for each of them that help to explain their habits. His experience in interviewing and studying these individuals, including Charles Manson and Ed Gein, established a framework for getting into the minds of the most disturbed perpetrators in the United States.

The main character of the series, Holden Ford, is based on Douglas, but the fictionalized part of the series is mainly the narrative that occurs in Ford’s personal life with his girlfriend, Debbie (Hannah Gross), as well as the personal lives of his partner, Bill Tench (based on real-life FBI agent Robert Ressler) and Dr. Wendy Carr (based on real-life Dr. Ann Burgess). Their work on creating a system of serial killer profiling based on patterns in habits and psychology, however, is real enough, as is the criminals themselves. The real names of the serial killers that are interviewed and studied in the series are used, as well as their likenesses. The crimes of these killers, including Ed Kemper and Jerome Brudos, that appear in the show are also accurate. Mindhunter even used some dialogue from real video interviews with, for example, Kemper, the “Co-ed Killer,” in scenes in the show.

Holden Ford

Jonathan Groff’s captivating performance as Agent Holden Ford, the man determined to master the mind of a serial killer, is reason enough to watch Fincher’s new series. What makes Ford so interesting is the mystery behind his personality. At times you’re on this journey with him, experiencing his wonder and subtle horror while hanging on every word that comes out of a serial killer’s mouth.

Most of the time, though, Ford’s emotions are well hidden; so much so, in fact, that you will find yourself wondering whether or not Ford could be diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder like the killers interviewed in the show. Ford seems disgusted with the actions of some of the killers, but he also appears desensitized at times. He’s not afraid to break laws or rules to reach his goals, and Ford doesn’t usually show that he has any remorse for his actions when they cause turmoil.

With that being said, Ford isn’t entirely emotionless or heartless. What you come to figure out while watching his character over the ten-episode first season, is his ability to compartmentalize, as well as the negative side effects of immersing yourself so deeply into a serial killer’s mind. His relationships slowly begin to crumble throughout the season, and it all stems from his interactions during his in-person interviews with those serial killers, though he doesn’t seem to realize it’s happening until the season finale.

One of the best moments of the first season comes in the finale episode, when Ford’s walls are shattered in a moment of pure panic and fear, and the audience realizes how tightly his emotions have been buried underneath a relentlessly logical, determined, stubborn exterior, that has been slightly influenced by the darkness he surrounds himself with. Ford having to face the reality of what can happen to you when you delve too far into a serial killer’s mind and perspective is a powerful moment, and arguably the most revealing scene of Ford’s character.

The Behavioral Science Unit

The best part about Mindhunter is the relationship between Agents Ford and Bill Tench (Holt McCallanay). The two make a great serial killer investigating duo, their respective intelligence, personalities, and age difference providing a great balance and realistic partnership that also provides a bit of comedic relief at times.

Real-life FBI Agents Douglas and Ressler were actually the ones who initially coined the term “serial killer” in the first place, and their series counterparts Ford and Tench, with the help of Dr. Carr (Anna Torv), are seen perfecting the terminology the FBI and other law enforcement agencies still use today. This includes the established vernacular of grouping certain offenders into either “organized” or “disorganized” categories. In reality, trailblazer Dr. Burgess, who Carr is based on, didn’t join the team until after she established her expertise and pioneered “the treatment of trauma and abuse victims.”

Carr’s presence on the team in the show, however, creates another perspective that is refreshing and necessary for the audience. Carr brings a certain morality and organization to the group, meaning she sometimes finds herself in confrontation with the improvisational Ford on how the interviews with the serial killers should be handled. When the two characters clash, it brings up an interesting question: How far is too far when trying to understand or catch a serial killer? (Click link below to view the rest of this story)

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Like Father – Netflix Movie Trailer

Charmaine Blake

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Starring Kelsey Grammer & Kristen Bell
When a workaholic young executive (Kristen Bell), is left at the altar, she ends up on her Caribbean honeymoon cruise with the last person she ever expected: her estranged and equally workaholic father (Kelsey Grammer). The two depart as strangers, but over the course of a few adventures, a couple of umbrella-clad cocktails and a whole lot of soul-searching, they return with a renewed appreciation for family and life. Like Father premieres August 3 only on Netflix.

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Netflix’s ‘Lust Stories’ is Indian filmmaking at its finest

Charmaine Blake

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“As Indian cinema’s worldwide audience grows, most people are acquainted exclusively with Bollywood – Hindi-language romantic dramas full of dazzling song-and-dance numbers that may or may not be related to plot.

But Indian cinema has always been more than that, just as Italian film extends beyond neorealism or and the French New Wave is just one piece of a rich history. Cinephiles may know Satyajit Ray’s Apu trilogy, which offers a glimpse of the type of gritty auteurship that doesn’t pay the Bollywood bills, but speaks to some truly fine artistry. Indian short films remain a source of this ingenuity and excellence, and Netflix’s Lust Stories is a fresh new installment.

Like Bombay Talkies before it, Lust Stories is an anthology of short films from known Indian directors Anurag Kashyap, Zoya Akhtar, Dibakar Banerjee, and Karan Johar. They are exceedingly simple stories: a teacher’s obsession with…..”

Read more: https://mashable.com/2018/06/16/netflix-lust-stories/

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Netflixs latest hit The Kissing Booth is a Wattpad success story

Charmaine Blake

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“One of the most popular movies in the U.S. is a terrible teen rom-com called “The Kissing Booth,” and it’s not in theaters. Instead, this Netflix Original with its paltry 17 percent critics’ score on Rotten Tomatoes, shot up to become the No. 4 movie on IMDb, before more recently dropping down to No. 9. Its leads, Jacob Elordi and Joey King, also became the No. 1 and No. 6 most popular stars on IMDb’s StarMeter, respectively, shortly after the film’s launch.

The secret to the movie’s success, however, is not just a combination of teenagers’ questionable taste in entertainment and the power of Netflix’s distribution — though both play a major role, clearly.

Instead, it’s that “The Kissing Booth” is tapping into a built-in audience: teenage Wattpad users.

Yes, Wattpad.

In case you’re not familiar, Wattpad is an online site…..”

Read more: https://techcrunch.com/2018/06/14/netflixs-latest-hit-the-kissing-booth-is-a-wattpad-success-story/

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