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Bill Murray on good friends, bad bosses and Harvey Weinstein

Charmaine Blake

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The actor talks about loneliness, big families, his temperamental reputation and why he loves to live in the moment.

“The last time I met Bill Murray things got rather physical rather quickly. It was the 2014 Vanity Fair Oscars party and I was about to leave, bloated with celebrity sightings and starting to suffer from indigestion. But as I walked out I saw a man arrive who made me turn around and go right back in.

By now, Bill Murray has long bypassed mere celebrity status to become something close to a spiritual symbol, a guru of zen, and his frequent appearances among the masses (in a karaoke bar! In a couples engagement photo!) are reported on the internet with the excitement of sightings of the messiah. Ever since his pitch perfect performances in 90s classics Groundhog Day and Rushmore, he has enjoyed a career renaissance, shucking off his well-hewn 80s comedy persona to become one of the most delightful dramatic actors around in films such as Lost in Translation and The Royal Tenenbaums. But to me, he will always be the wisecracking rumpled cynic he played in the early comedies I grew up with: Scrooged, Stripes, Tootsie, Meatballs and, of course, Ghostbusters. Watching him stride past was like watching my childhood walk by. I failed to play it cool.

Mr Murray, my names Hadley Freeman I began, expecting him, at most, to nod, say hi and walk away. I was wrong.

Oh, there, there, nobodys perfect, he bellowed. Come here, you look ill.

He then picked me up and, while giving me an enormous bear hug, swung me around the room.

This womans very ill! She needs a doctor! Shes ill! he shouted.

Eventually he put me down, rumpled my hair and disappeared into the party. As I walked towards the bar for a steadying drink…”

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/jun/01/im-nothing-but-compost-bill-murray-on-good-friends-bad-bosses-and-harvey-weinstein

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‘Roma’: Inside the Best Movie of the Year and an Oscar Hopeful

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“Roma opens on the floor: a patch of stone tiling that, every few moments, floods with a rush of soapy water. Reflected in the wavelets is a rippling sliver of sky—a glimmer of the heavens as beheld from rigid terra firma. Later, in a moving visual inversion that can only represent transcendence, the film concludes by panning upward to grant us, for the first time, an unobstructed celestial view.

With patience, fragility, and a divine sense of detachment, Roma is Alfonso Cuarón’s most sublime movie since Y Tu Mamá También. In storytelling grace and finesse, it is unparalleled this year. Unfolding in razor-edged black and white, the film captures a moment of unrest—both civil and emotional—in early 1970s Mexico City, when class and gender hierarchies were stark and insurmountable. Several devastating sequences illuminate these challenges with graphic clarity, though for the most part the film takes a tranquil stance, capturing a slice of neo-realist life through the eyes of an aesthete.

Written and directed by Alfonso Cuarón and based on his own upbringing, Roma, which played the New York Film Festival and will hit Netflix on December 14, observes the life of Cleo (Yalitza Aparicio), a young housekeeper (her exact age we never know) of Mixtec heritage burdened with the domestic and psychological labor of rearing and nurturing an upper middle class family……………………”

Read the rest of the article by clicking here: https://www.thedailybeast.com/roma-inside-the-best-movie-of-the-year-and-an-oscar-hopeful

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‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ clip

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“You can’t mistake that drum beat. You know when to clap, when to stomp. But do you know how Queen’s “We Will Rock You” was actually written?

In a new clip from upcoming Queen biopic Bohemian Rhapsody, Rami Malek as legendary frontman Freddie Mercury is introduced to the song by Gwilym Lee as iconic guitarist Brian May.

“I wanna give the audience a song they can perform,” says Lee as May. “Imagine… thousands of people doing this in unison.”

“What’s the lyric?” asks Malek as Mercury.

Then, we get a little sneak peek into one of the most prolific songs in music history, fronted by an electrifying Malek.

Bohemian Rhapsody hits cinemas Oct. 24. Here’s the official trailer to pump you up.”

Read more: https://mashable.com/video/bohemian-rhapsody-we-will-rock-you-queen-clip/

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‘First Man’ composer Justin Hurwitz on setting Neil Armstrong’s otherworldly journey to music

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“How can a movie capture an experience that everyone in the world has heard about, but only an extremely privileged few will ever get to have firsthand?

Well, for starters, it’s got to have the right music.

That’s the task composer Justin Hurwitz faced when he signed up for First Man, director Damien Chazelle’s telling of Neil Armstrong’s journey to the moon. But while reading Josh Singer’s script, Hurwitz was most struck by how alienating the trip must have been for Armstrong.

“I really responded to this idea in the script that after Neil went to the moon, he would be very alone for the rest of his life, a stranger from the rest of humanity,” he told Mashable in an email, “because nobody else has had the experience he had, and seen the things he has seen.”

First Man wasn’t entirely unfamiliar territory for Hurwitz. He’d worked with Chazelle before on………………………………….”

Read more: https://mashable.com/video/first-man-score-justin-hurwitz/

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