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Evil Genius: Netflix Latest True Crime Addiction Explores the Pizza Bomber Heist

Charmaine Blake

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“On August 28, 2003, 46-year-old pizza deliveryman Brian Wells walked into a PNC Bank in Erie, Pennsylvania, with a cane that was actually a shotgun and a bomb strapped to his body.

Demanding $250,000, he got approximately $8,000, but his getaway was stymied by responding police officers, who sat him down in the middle of a nearby road, where they quickly discovered that he wasnt lying about his explosive device. The thing was, the bomb was attached to a giant metal collar around his neck, and Brianwho was in possession of nine pages of rambling handwritten notes, some of which contained instructions for a scavenger hunt he was supposed to complete in order to release himself from the explosivedesperately wanted it removed. Its going to go off. Im not lying, he warned police, and before the bomb unit could arrive, go off it did, blowing him to kingdom come.

It was a sight straight out of a Saw sequeland so horrifying, it legitimately earns the designation unforgettable.

Wells fatal fate is depicted in stark video footage at the beginning of Evil Genius: The True Story of Americas Most Diabolical Bank Heist, and establishes the mood of callous violence and perplexing treachery that defines Netflixs latest true-crime gem. Executive produced by Wild Wild Countrys Mark and Jay Duplass, and written and directed by Barbara Schroeder (alongside co-director and executive producer Trey Borzillieri), this four-part documentary series is yet another of the streaming services based-on-real-events triumphs; a mystery so bizarre and confounding, one wouldnt dare write it as fiction for fear of having it labeled unrealistic. Its no surprise that Schroeder avoids excessive aesthetic embroidery for her materialthe insanity speaks for itself.

As is soon revealed by Evil Genius, Wells wound up with his collar after delivering a pizza to a remote tower site, where he claimed (shortly before his demise) that some African-American men had affixed the contraption to his neck. There were signs of struggle at that location, but as with the…”

Read more: https://www.thedailybeast.com/evil-genius-netflixs-latest-true-crime-addiction-explores-the-pizza-bomber-heist

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‘The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society is basically an episode of ‘Downton Abbey’

Charmaine Blake

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Image: netflix

“Right this very instant, somewhere out there the Downton Abbey movie is being made. Perhaps the Crawley family is having a hushed conversation as cameras circle in. Or maybe the cast and crew are on a dainty craft services break!

Regardless, the Downton Abbey movie is happening. And we have no release date.

Lucky for those of us with 20th century England fantasies that need tending, Netflix’s new film The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society is a two-hour episode of Downton Abbey—figuratively speaking—based on Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows’ book of the same name.

Set in the years following World War II, the film follows the lives of members of a book club formed during the German occupation of Guernsey, an island in the English Channel off the coast of Normandy. Overwhelmed by the bleak and oppressive realities of Nazi presence, residents of the island begin secretly meeting to add some much needed levity and love to their days, creating the “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society” book club in the process.

However, the formation of the club is not the film’s main focus. The true star of the story is found in writer Juliet Ashton, portrayed by the illustrious Lily James—and known to many as Downton‘s Lady Rose MacClare……………”

Read more: https://mashable.com/2018/08/14/guernsey-literay-potato-peel-pie-netflix-lily-james/

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Iron Fist Season 2 Trailer – Netflix

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It’s not a weapon to be held. It’s a weapon to be used.
Season 2 of Marvel’s Iron Fist debuts exclusively on Netflix September 7, 2018.

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Is Netflix the new king of stand-up comedy?

Charmaine Blake

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(CNN)For fans of stand-up comedy, this decade has been a dream come true.

“That’s because more stand-up is available to watch now than there has been in years. It’s largely due to Netflix, which has poured millions into expanding its library of stand-up specials.
While longtime stalwarts such as HBO and Comedy Central have dialed back their investments in stand-up, Netflix has opened up its checkbook.
Netflix has largely gone unchallenged on the streaming front, but that battle will soon reach a fever pitch. HBO is being pressured to expand its library to compete against Netflix (CNN and HBO are both owned by WarnerMedia), Amazon Studios is growing and investing more into original programming and, arguably the biggest threat of all, Disney’s streaming service is set to launch next year.
Continuing to build up an arsenal of original content to separate themselves from the competition could be the key to winning the war.
Netflix has made a bold choice to double down on stand-up. While the company was founded in 1997, it didn’t start producing original content until 2012. Meanwhile, the legacy video giants that it has challenged in the stand-up space have been producing specials for decades.
It may be a big bet for Netflix, but it’s a proven strategy.
“If you look at the history of relatively new channels, they often go early into stand-up,” says Jason Zinoman, comedy critic for The New York Times. “HBO invested in stand-up early in the ’70s. Stand-up is cheap, and you can get a huge amount of attention for something that only requires a microphone stand and one employee.”
Another reason to focus on stand-up, says Jonas Larsen, executive vice president and co-head of talent and development for Comedy Central, is star power.
“On one hand, to be able to put Jerry Seinfeld or Chris Rock on a billboard and a bus and have the Netflix logo next to it, it drives subscribers so it makes sense,” says Larsen. “It’s almost like marketing dollars that they’re paying for content because it’s marketing their brand. So maybe it makes sense for them to spend that kind of money to get the press.”
More important than adding subscribers is retaining them.
Over the years, Netflix has gathered……………..”

Read more: https://www.cnn.com/2018/08/13/entertainment/netflix-standup-comedy-central-hbo-chappelle-rock/index.html

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