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Greta Gerwig regrets Woody Allen film: ‘I will not work for him again’

Charmaine Blake

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Actor, writer and director says if I had known then what I know now, I would not have acted in [To Rome With Love]

Greta Gerwig has expressed regret over working with Woody Allen on 2012 film To Rome With Love, saying in an online roundtable, If I had known then what I know now, I would not have acted in the film.

At the Golden Globes this week, where Gerwigs critically acclaimed film Lady Bird won in two of four nominated categories, the actor, writer and director dodged a question about working with Allen.

Allen has been the subject of decades-long allegations of sexual abuse by his adopted daughter Dylan Farrow, which he continues to deny.

Its something that Ive thought deeply about, and I care deeply about, Gerwig said on Sunday night. I havent had an opportunity to have an in-depth discussion where I come down on one side or another.

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Greta Gerwig questioned about working with Woody Allen backstage at the Globes on Sunday – video

Some criticised Gerwig for evading the question, while others drew attention to the gendered pattern of holding women like Gerwig and Kate Winslet more accountable for working with Allen than men.

Erica C. Barnett (@ericacbarnett)

Yo, while we’re (correctly and righteously) trashing the women who worked with Woody Allen and are now hypocritically saying #TIMESUP, can we PLEASE also talk about all the MEN who worked with him and are not experiencing remotely similar levels of scrutiny right now?

January 9, 2018

Bailey Disler (@baytato)

Another day, another d(ay watching people attack primarily women for working with Woody Allen in the past instead of the men or instead of Woody Allen him damn self)ollar

January 10, 2018

But on Tuesday night, in an online discussion with Aaron Sorkin hosted by the New York Times which covered the #MeToo wave in Hollywood, cultural appropriation and the impact of streaming services on the industry, Gerwig clarified her position on Allen.

Responding to a broad question about how allegations against artists like Allen should affect their legacy and future opportunities, Gerwig said: I would like to speak specifically to the Woody Allen question, which I have been asked about a couple of times recently … It is something that I take very seriously and have been thinking deeply about, and it has taken me time to gather my thoughts and say what I mean to say.

I can only speak for myself and what Ive come to is this: if I had known then what I know now, I would not have acted in the film. I have not worked for him again, and I will not work for him again.

Gerwig mentioned two pieces written by Dylan Farrow one in 2014, when she first publicly addressed her allegations against Allen, and another in October 2017 when she questioned why he was being spared in the #MeToo revolution. In the second piece, Farrow namechecked Gerwig, Winslet and Blake Lively as three A-list women who had broadly supported the movement while failing to account for their own professional support of Allen.

Dylan Farrows two different pieces made me realise that I had increased another womans pain, and I was heartbroken by that realisation, Gerwig said. I grew up on his movies, and they have informed me as an artists, and I cannot change that fact now, but I can make different decisions moving forward.

Gerwig described the politicised Golden Globes ceremony as an extraordinary night which was indicative of a turning point for women.

I think that the way women have come together to lead the Times Up movement and to make clear goals for our industry is how we are going to move forward with purposefulness. I was very moved that the stage was given to the leaders of this movement and the people who can be change agents. These are the women who should be apologised to, and that they were given the space was meaningful.

The fact that many of the women attended with feminist activists from across all industries made the night even more resonant with this moment.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/jan/11/greta-gerwig-regrets-woody-allen-film-i-will-not-work-for-him-again

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Frances McDormand: two defining roles, two decades apart

Charmaine Blake

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Her reaction to an Oscar for Fargo suggested a complex attitude towards fame. With Three Billboards, it will be tested again

 

Frances McDormand: two defining roles, two decades apart

Her reaction to an Oscar for Fargo suggested a complex attitude towards fame. With Three Billboards, it will be tested again

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/feb/17/frances-mcdormand-two-defining-roles-two-decades-apart

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Who is the best Oscar-winning lead actress of all time?

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Elizabeth Taylor? Meryl Streep? Frances McDormand? Our chief critic picks a winner from his five nominees and reveals who you chose as your champion

 

Who is the best Oscar-winning lead actress of all time?

Who is the best Oscar-winning lead actress of all time?

Elizabeth Taylor? Meryl Streep? Frances McDormand? Our chief critic picks a winner from his five nominees and reveals who you chose as your champion

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/feb/14/best-oscar-winning-lead-actress-of-all-time-elizabeth-taylor-meryl-streep-frances-mcdormand

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Netflix, Amazon Billions Lure Hollywood Hitmakers to Jump Ship

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Netflix Inc.’s surprise $300 million deal to poach Ryan Murphy from 21st Century Fox Inc. shows just how easy it’s getting for rich tech companies to steal Hollywood’s top talent.

 
 

Netflix, which released its first original series just six years ago, has now lured two of the most successful producers in TV — Murphy and Shonda Rhimes — from two of the industry’s most valuable companies. Rhimes, the producer of “Grey’s Anatomy” and “Scandal,” bolted from Walt Disney Co.’s ABC in August.

 
 

No longer content to license shows from other media companies, Netflix and fellow technology giant Amazon.com Inc. are throwing money at Hollywood’s top talent to lure them away from those studios. They are upending the TV business in the process, driving up the cost of talent and weakening many of the traditional powers.

 
 

Hollywood studios have endured threats from outsiders before, but the list of talent making the jump grows by the day.

 
 

Horror Story

Netflix, with an annual budget of $8 billion, is paying Murphy, the producer of “American Horror Story,” about $300 million over five years to make shows and movies for the streaming service. The money will support overhead for Ryan Murphy Productions along with his fees for writing, directing and producing.

Murphy was in the process of negotiating a new deal at Fox when Disney agreed to buy its crosstown rival for more than $52 billion. Disney Chief Executive Officer Bob Iger made a personal call to Murphy, assuring him that “the reason Disney was interested in buying Fox is they believed in the assets and the executives and their creators,” the producer recalled. “He was very sweet and transparent and kind.”

Shondaland

Rhimes was the biggest name to leave traditional TV for streaming when she announced she was signing a long-term deal with Netflix. She’d worked at ABC for more than a decade, becoming one of the few showrunners and TV writers known to the public.

Rhimes is also one of the few prominent black showrunners in Hollywood, and has led the way in creating more diversity onscreen. Netflix gave her more than $100 million to ease the transition in a multiyear deal.

Zombies

Robert Kirkman, the creator of cable TV’s biggest hit, “The Walking Dead,” signed a two-year deal with Amazon last August, days before Netflix announced its deal with Rhimes. Amazon spent an estimated $4.5 billion on video programming last year and plans to increase its budget this year. Amazon’s “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” won the Golden Globe award for best TV comedy.

Millarworld

Netflix knows its customers love comic book movies and TV shows thanks to a pair of deals with Disney, owner of Marvel Studios. So last year it acquired the company that published graphic novels “Wanted” and “Kick-Ass,” both of which were adapted into hit movies for Universal Pictures.

Netflix and Millarworld founder Mark Millar will jointly produce films, series and children’s shows based on comic-book characters for the streaming service, while the publisher will also continue to make comics under the Netflix label. The streaming service will turn some of Millar’s other creations into film and TV properties that can replace Marvel when its deal with Disney ends.

New Golden Boy

Shawn Levy rose through the ranks of Hollywood by directing comedy films for major studios, including “Cheaper by the Dozen” and “Night at the Museum.” Yet he has since been reborn as one of the hottest producers in TV thanks to “Stranger Things,” the surprise Netflix fantasy hit. The streaming service locked up Levy’s TV business last year, and now funnels all kinds of high-concept projects his way.

Amazon has also allied itself with Sharon Horgan, the British comic and actress who created its critically beloved comedy “Catastrophe.” Though Horgan has a show on HBO (“Divorce”), Amazon gets first dibs on all future work.

 

Read more: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-02-15/netflix-amazon-billions-lure-hollywood-hitmakers-to-jump-ship

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