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James Bond on film, 007’s Best and Worst Movies Ranked!

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With the news of Danny Boyles departure as director of the next 007 instalment, we rank the big-screen outings of Britains finest, from 1962s Dr No to 2015s Spectre

26. Casino Royale (1967)

Wrong. Wrong, wrong, wrong. Even a cameo from Orson Welles couldnt lend lustre to this pointless and unfunny spoof, a dire tongue-in-cheeker that slipped past the franchise control of the producers, Eon. David Niven saunters unsexily as the retired Sir James Bond in this chaotic film.

25. Die Another Day (2002)

Oh lawdy. The Bond franchise was looking lost in the grim and joyless new war on terror-era, and this movie featured the worst gadget in the history of 007: an invisible car. What on earth is the point of that? You can almost see the P45 being pressed into Brosnans hand.

24. The Living Daylights (1987)

Timothy
Timothy Dalton and Maryam DAbo in The Living Daylights. Photograph: Allstar/United Artists

This was the turn of straight actor and RSC stalwart Timothy Dalton. He was supposedly there to give Bond a hard and gritty new seriousness, but always just looked a bit humourless. This was during the Aids era of sexual restraint, too, so Bond only cops off a couple of times.

23. Licence to Kill (1989)

Bond goes rogue, and Dalton stays dull. This one is notable for the young Benicio del Toro as a humble henchman. After this, legal copyright rows caused a six-year production hiatus during which Dalton quit.

22. For Your Eyes Only (1981)

You can hear a whistling and a crackling in the air as Roger Moore begins to tune out. The stunts hold up, but Moore is on the exit ramp and his flaccid relationship with 24-year-old Carole Bouquet is a deathly embarrassment.

21. Never Say Never Again (1983)

The title is what Connerys agent should have shouted at him when he was offered the comeback: (Never! Say Never! Again!) Connery lumbers back for the remake of Thunderball that no one wanted or needed. He was never a six-pack guy at the best of times, but hes out of condition here. One to forget.

20. Quantum of Solace (2008)

Much mocked at the time, this film wasnt as bad as that despite the silliest title in the series history. Craig is always watchable and Mathieu Amalric is a very eccentric oddball villain.

19. The World Is Not Enough (1999)

Not bad, but some of the fizz has gone. In this film, the distinction between villain and henchman seems to collapse with three bad guys: Robert Carlyle, Robbie Coltrane and, erm, Goldie, who was very big in those days.

18. GoldenEye (1995)

Was it a Bondaissance? A Brosnanaissance? Whatever. Stylish yet assertive smoothie Pierce Brosnan had already made an impression in the TV caper Remington Steele. He took to Bond like a duck to water: virile, cool, nice suits. Judi Dench made her debut as M. Bond was back!

17. A View to a Kill (1985)

Quite unexpectedly, Moore pulled it back a bit for his last hurrah. (It was also, sadly, the last hurrah for Lois Maxwells Miss Moneypenny.) Christopher Walken was always destined to play a Bond villain and it came to pass in this film, as the evil electronics mogul Max Zorin. A good note for Moore to bow out on.

16. Moonraker (1979)

A whopping, megabudget Bond in its day, clearly influenced by the Star Wars-led sci-fi revival. It is all about the theft of a space shuttle, but this excursion into space cant conceal the fact that Moore is looking a bit jaded…………………………”

Read the rest of the list here: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/aug/24/james-bond-on-film-ranked

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Princess Diana was set to star in sequel to The Bodyguard with Kevin Costner

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Actor has confirmed the late Princess of Wales was keen to play role after conversations instigated by Sarah Ferguson

“Kevin Costner has confirmed that the late Princess of Wales was set to star alongside him in a sequel to 1992 hit The Bodyguard, in which he starred as an agent assigned to protect a pop star played by Whitney Houston.

Speaking to PeopleTV, Costner said that he, Diana and producers were eager to get the project off the ground.”

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The 10 best films of 2019 (so far)

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“It’s been a rough ride, but here we finally are at the end of a long year. Pop the champagne! Raise your glasses! We’ve done it, guys! We’ve suffered and struggled and lived to tell the tale!

Except, wait… what’s that you’re telling me? We’re only halfway through 2019? And we need to do all of this all over again before we’re finally done with this year?

Ugh.

Well, at least we’ve got the movies to help pass the time. The first half of 2019 has already given us so many new films to treasure — to laugh at, marvel at, ponder, or feel omg-so-SEEN by. Here are some of our favorites so far:

10. John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum

The third entry in the John Wick saga digs ever deeper into the gloriously absurd mythology of this particular underworld, turning up killer dogs, gold-minting factories, punctilious bureaucrats, and even a handful of gushing John Wick fanboys………………………”

See the rest of the list here…

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Why the dance numbers in the new ‘Aladdin’ are so disappointing

Charmaine Blake

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‘Remember the steps. Remember your training. Do not embarrass us.’

Image: Daniel Smith/disney

“Disney’s highly anticipated Aladdin is here, but we know better than to expect anything groundbreaking from another needless live-action adaptation. While remake has pleasantly surprised most critics with colorful costumes and charismatic leads, Aladdin‘s signature songs are its biggest disappointment.

From Mashable’s own Angie Han: “Guy Ritchie and his team seem to have no idea how to stage and shoot a musical number,” which is precisely the opposite of what you want to hear about the director of a movie musical (much less one who was married to Madonna).

So, where and how did Aladdin botch its opportunities for movie musical greatness? Let us count the ways.

Image: giphy

Aladdin is tricky to negotiate from a representational standpoint because it was never based on one specific culture. The animated film was an amalgam of Middle Eastern and South Asian visual inspirations, and the live-action takes this at face value, doing the same and adding literally nothing to it. This piece references Bollywood dance numbers a few times, not because of any confusion about where Aladdin takes place, but because India has a booming film industry that thrives on movie musicals that Disney would’ve done well to study…………………………………………………”

Read more: https://mashable.com/article/aladdin-dancing/

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