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Kevin Spacey will be literally deleted from his new movie

Charmaine Blake

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Kevin Spacey in September.

Image: Getty Images for Bits & Pretzels

We are swiftly learning that “isolated incident” is not a part of the narrative of sexual misconduct accusations gripping Hollywood – where there is one allegation, more are likely soon to follow.

This is not lost on Sony Pictures, which on Wednesday – the same day new groping allegations surfaced against Kevin Spacey – reportedly decided that the Oscar winner will be completely removed from his next film, All the Money in the World, and his scenes re-shot with Christopher Plummer in the not-insignificant role of J Paul Getty.

Director Ridley Scott was aiming to start re-shoots immediately, Deadline first reported, and hopes to still hit his Dec. 22 release date. That would be quite a feat indeed, considering that Spacey plays an important supporting role as the oil tycoon who negotiates with kidnappers demanding a ransom for his grandson.

The film was originally slated to be the closing-night gala at AFI Fest next week, but was pulled from the schedule on Monday. Sony was not able to immediately confirm the new plans.

The news comes just a week after Anthony Rapp and Harry Dreifuss accused Spacey of groping them, just the latest in a landslide of allegations against Hollywood elite that started with Harvey Weinstein.

Earlier Wednesday, former Boston TV news anchor Heather Unruh came forward to say the House of Cards actor sexually assaulted her teenage son after buying him “drink after drink after drink” at a Nantucket, Mass., nightclub last July.

“To Kevin Spacey, I want to say this – shame on you for what you did to my son,” Unruh said at a morning news conference.

Unruh became emotional as she described how Spacey allegedly stuck his hand down her then 18-year-old son’s pants and grabbed his genitals at the Club Car restaurant without warning or consent.

“The victim, my son, was a star-struck, straight, 18-year-old young man who had no idea that the famous actor was an alleged sexual predator — or that he was about to become his next victim. My son was not of legal age to drink alcohol, and he told Kevin Spacey that he was of legal age. But whether he was of legal age or not, Kevin Spacey had no right to assault him.”

She said her son tried to “shift his body to remove his hand” but the groping continued, and “my son froze.” She added that when Spacey asked him to come to a private after-party and briefly left to go to the bathroom, her son ran.

“It harmed him and it cannot be undone,” she said.

Unruh said her son was too scared and ashamed to file a police report at the time, but did so last week, which triggered a criminal investigation. Her lawyer, Mitchell Garabedian, said their civil claim as well as the criminal complaint fall within the statutes of limitations.

Following Rapp’s allegations last week, Spacey tweeted this:

Unruh took serious issue with Spacey’s tacked-on revelation: “Shame on you for using your apology to Anthony Rapp to come out as a gay man. That was an appalling attempt to deflect attention away from what you really are: a sexual predator.”

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/11/08/kevin-spacey-all-the-money-in-the-world-movie-christopher-plummer/

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Ron Howard reveals George Lucas’ involvement in ‘Solo’

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Alden Ehrenreich (Han Solo) with George Lucas and Ron Howard at the Hollywood premiere of ‘Solo.’

Image: kevin winter/Getty Images

“He may have retired from the galaxy far, far away after he sold his company for $4 billion in 2012. But Star Wars creator George Lucas has his fingerprints all over the latest movie in the Disney-Lucasfilm canon — according to his friend, Solo director Ron Howard.

Not only did Lucas come up with the idea for a Han Solo spin-off first — long before Rogue One was a thing — but he was there on set to offer advice on how his creation would behave. And he even tried his hand at acting: pitching one scene, “he played Han Solo,” Howard says.

In a wide-ranging interview with Mashable, Howard also recalled how Lucas first told him about Star Wars on the set of American Graffiti in 1972, explained why the look of the film is a homage to  Lucas’ signature style, and dangled the possibility that Lucas could return to direct more Star Wars films — if the fans wanted.

Here’s our Q&A, which has been edited for length, clarity and the removal of spoilers.

Mashable: One of my first responses to seeing Solo, and I mean this in the best possible way, was: it’s the dirtiest Star Wars ever.  

Ron Howard: Good! That sort of visual honesty was really important to the cinematographer, Bradford Young. I really agreed with it. The idea that really hooked him was that he could shoot some of this in [1971 Western] McCable and Mrs. Miller style. I was thinking of gritty, existential 1970s car movies like Bullitt and Vanishing Point.

M: That was George Lucas’ breakthrough with Star Wars; he talked about the used universe, making space feel lived-in. Did you feel like you were kind of dropping the mic on the used universe? Like, it can’t get more used than this. 

RH: [Laughs] Well, the more you begin to really drill down on the way of life and the characters — and this is probably the most character-driven of the movies. I mean, it’s not an epic war story. It’s not political. It really is: how do these relationships impact Han?

The more up close and personal we get with the characters, the more used the universe is going to feel. It’s those details about how things really work — that’s the stuff prop makers and set designers just love to explore. They pull out references from different corners of our Earth and find ways to adapt them.

M: Were you there saying “throw more mud at that Wookiee?”

RH: Oh yeah, that was part of the promise of this. As action adventure movies go, I always loved Road Warrior. And while there’s nothing post-apocalyptic about Solo, we are in a lawless time. Some of it takes place in frontier towns. [Han’s homeworld] has this grimy port culture with a seedy underbelly. That grime is part of what’s interesting about this movie.

Ron Howard and George Lucas on the set of ‘American Graffiti’ (1973).

Image: Universal

M: Let’s go back to American Graffiti. I’ve talked to other actors on that movie and they have these…”

Read more: https://mashable.com/2018/05/23/solo-ron-howard-interview/

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Charlize Theron will play Megyn Kelly in a movie about Roger Ailes

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Charlize Theron at a screening of Tullyin New York City.

Image: John Lamparski / WireImage

Charlize Theron is ready to take on Megyn Kelly.

The Hollywood Reporter writes that Theron has been cast as the former Fox News anchor in an as-yet-untitled project about the downfall of Fox News chairman Roger Ailes.

The script, by Charles Randolph (The Big Short), is said to center on the sexual misconduct allegations raised against Ailes in 2016 — first by Gretchen Carlson in a lawsuit, and then by numerous other women including Kelly. Ailes was forced to resign later that same year.

Carlson is also expected to be a character in the film, along with other prominent Fox News figures like Bill O’Reilly, Greta Van Susteren, and Rupert Murdoch. Theron is the only cast member announced so far.

Theron has excelled at playing complicated and even unlikable characters — she won an Oscar in 2004 for playing serial killer Aileen Wuornos. She currently stars in Tully, which reunites her with Young Adult duo Jason Reitman and Diablo Cody.

The Fox News project is being helmed by Jay Roach, who’s gotten into the habit of making films about recent political events. He also directed Recount, about the 2000 presidential election, and Game Change, about the 2008 one, and is attached to direct the TV adaptation of Michael Wolff’s Fire and Fury.

Annapurna Pictures is producing the movie, which does not yet have a release date.

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Rashida Jones addresses her departure from ‘Toy Story 4’

Charmaine Blake

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Rashida Jones at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party in 2018.

Image: Presley Ann / Patrick McMullan via Getty Images

It’s hardly news that Hollywood tends to favor white men, to the exclusion of everyone else. And Rashida Jones is done putting up with it.

Jones called out Pixar’s lack of diversity in an interview with Net-a-Porter, while explaining why she and writing partner Will McCormack left Toy Story 4 last year.

Describing the situation as “complicated,” Jones said:

You look at [Pixar’s] track record and it was one woman directing one film in 25 years, and she was fired. But that doesn’t look different from most studios in Hollywood. All I can be is myself, and speak up and be honest when I feel things don’t reflect the world as it today. As a corporation, you will be held accountable.

The one female director Jones is referring to is Brenda Chapman, who was to be Pixar’s first female director before she was taken off of Brave and replaced by Mark Andrews.

While Jones did not go into further detail about her experience at Pixar, her comments echo the statement she and McCormack issued last November, when they decided to depart the project.

At the time, the pair were pushing back against a Hollywood Reporter article claiming they’d left due to an unwanted advance made on Jones by now-disgraced Pixar chief John Lasseter.

That statement read:

We parted ways because of creative and, more importantly, philosophical differences. There is so much talent at Pixar, and we remain enormous fans of their films. However, it is also a culture where women and people of color do not have an equal creative voice.

A look at Pixar’s future releases indicates that the studio won’t be breaking its all-male director streak anytime soon. Upcoming titles include Incredibles 2, directed by Brad Bird; Toy Story 4, directed by Josh Cooley; and an untitled suburban fantasy film, directed by Dan Scanlon.

On the other hand, the studio is getting its first female-helmed short this summer: Bao, from Domee Shi. Maybe change is coming for the studio, even if it’s a lot more slowly than we’d like.

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