Connect with us

Netflix Stuff

Lovesick Season 3 Trailer

Charmaine Blake

Published

on

Lovesick

It’s official: The best Netflix show you’re not watching is coming back on New Year’s Day, and now there’s a trailer for the third season, too.

It’s time for you to start watching Lovesick. There are only two seasons, with 14 episodes, and each one’s around 25-30 minutes. Get it on it now. Here’s the deal:

The dumbest way to describe Lovesick is How I Met Your Mother, but British.

Smarter way to describe it: It’s a show with a more sophisticated conceit than that—one that’s dedicated less to a cloying plot device (meant to extend the show into perpetuity forever and drive viewers insane), and instead one with a hilarious (but believable) plot device designed to elucidate poignancy where the agony and ecstasy of trying to negotiate a life between romanticism and reality is concerned. While also understanding all of the various ways your past relationships impact your present. And letting all of your exes know you might’ve given them an STD.

That’s Lovesick!

Here’s the second season trailer:

It’s a phenomenally funny, wonderful, warmhearted show. And it’s got a funny little past: At one point, the show was called Scrotal Recall—thankfully, showrunners decided to rename it for the second season, and (shocker) it gained a following.

The plot, in its most basic form:

– Dylan (Johnny Flynn) goes for an STD test in the pilot, and finds out he’s got chlamydia.

– Each episode, named for one of Dylan’s exes, generally begins with Dylan informing an ex that they might want to get checked out, too.

– From there, the majority of the episode runs as a flashback of a significant moment in that past relationship.

– But the flashbacks aren’t about Dylan’s past girlfriends so much as how each one represented a significant moment in his current life, involving him, his friends, and his current relationship, and how they’re affecting his life now.

– Those people are Dylan’s cad best friend Luke (Daniel Ings) a walking, talking lad-mag/ticking time bomb of an existential crisis, who once introduced Dylan to his best lady friend, Evie (Antonio Thomas). Evie’s been secretly in love with Dylan for quite a bit. Dylan’s been in love with Evie. The timing’s always been just one minute south of right.

– That timing is complicated in the pilot by the arrival of Dylan’s newest girlfriend, and the first woman he told about the chlamydia, Abigail (Hannah Britland). Also, there’s Angus (Joshua McGwire), the one with an ostensibly picture-perfect marriage and future which, of course, goes hilariously, wonderfully wrong. And forces him to reinvent his entire life.

If this sounds a little too toploaded with Nick Hornby for you, well, (A) disdain for Nick Hornby is cliche and myopic and (B) we’re living in the golden age of mature romantic comedies for adults (see: Insecure)that we haven’t had since the days of Frasier or Living Single. This is something we should deeply embrace because it’s been long overdue.

Moreover: The structure’s brilliant. The characters are funny without descending into caricature. You’re forced to root for everyone on the show. There aren’t great people or terrible people or right decisions or wrong decisions in the world of Lovesick—it’s a show about the way feelings of love evolve through the lens of our own lives, and how that can affect our choice of romantic partners, for better or worse, no matter how wise or dumb or selfish or cynical or prudent that might be.

And if you don’t take our word for it: Slate loves it. The AV Club loves it. Paste loves it. The Guardian loves it. And yet: Lovesick is one of those shows TV critics don’t spend too much time kvelling over. Instead, so many of the stories about it are like this one, in which someone writes a personal ode to a wonderful little show with a dedicated audience.

That’s fine. Not every show needs to be the epic conquerer of day-after Slacks and podcasts and Woke Olympian Twitter Fights.

And all the better: In 2018, here’s hoping we get a more diverse range of television shows that don’t force overanalysis, or superfandom, or those absurd “Are you kidding me?!” reactions some people give others when they admit they’ve never seen Game Of Thrones. At the end of 2017, television that’s great and a small hit and not a cultural force is also television that hasn’t had the fun sapped out of it by overindulged saturation point internet bullshit. How refreshing does that sound? (So very refreshing, is the correct answer.)

Lovesick is so many of the things we should aspire to be in 2018: Warm, empathetic, grounded in reality without being overly cynical, and funny. It’s also just a great, easy watch. And it’s something you’ve been missing. It’s not that your life will be incomplete without it, or that you’ll miss out on some important conversation/moment in pop culture history if you don’t watch it. But again: All the better for those of us who do tune in.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/12/26/lovesick-season-3-trailer-preview/

Netflix Stuff

Netflixs latest hit The Kissing Booth is a Wattpad success story

Charmaine Blake

Published

on

“One of the most popular movies in the U.S. is a terrible teen rom-com called “The Kissing Booth,” and it’s not in theaters. Instead, this Netflix Original with its paltry 17 percent critics’ score on Rotten Tomatoes, shot up to become the No. 4 movie on IMDb, before more recently dropping down to No. 9. Its leads, Jacob Elordi and Joey King, also became the No. 1 and No. 6 most popular stars on IMDb’s StarMeter, respectively, shortly after the film’s launch.

The secret to the movie’s success, however, is not just a combination of teenagers’ questionable taste in entertainment and the power of Netflix’s distribution — though both play a major role, clearly.

Instead, it’s that “The Kissing Booth” is tapping into a built-in audience: teenage Wattpad users.

Yes, Wattpad.

In case you’re not familiar, Wattpad is an online site…..”

Read more: https://techcrunch.com/2018/06/14/netflixs-latest-hit-the-kissing-booth-is-a-wattpad-success-story/

Continue Reading

Netflix Stuff

Anthony Bourdain’s ‘Parts Unknown’ to stay on Netflix after new deal

Published

on

You can still catch one of Chef Anthony Bourdain’s well-loved shows on Netflix.

Image: Getty Images

As the world continues to reel from the tragic death of Anthony Bourdain, many fans have been revisiting his great work, from books to television. Now Netflix has announced it’ll still be easy for fans to do so on its streaming service.

The run of the chef’s CNN series, Anthony Bourdain: Parts Unknown, was to leave the streaming service on Saturday, June 16. But Netflix announced on Tuesday afternoon that they’ve reached an agreement to continuing offering the series for an indefinite amount of time.

Mashable has reached out to Netflix for additional details on the new deal.

The show ran for 96 episodes over 11 “seasons” beginning in 2013. CNN is airing the final episodes throughout the month of June. Bourdain was filming an episode of the show in France when he died.

Parts Unknown is an important part of Bourdain’s legacy because it represents what he did so well: using his fame and platform not just to expose viewers to different cultures through the lens of food, but to educate them as well, making the world just a little bit smaller.

If you want to talk to someone or are experiencing suicidal thoughts, text the Crisis Text Line at 741-741 or call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. Here is a list of international resources.

Read more: https://mashable.com/2018/06/12/anthony-bourdain-parts-unknown-netflix/

Continue Reading

Netflix Stuff

Luke Cage Season 2 – Trailer #2

Published

on

Harlem can only handle one devil at a time. Season 2 of Marvel’s Luke Cage debuts exclusively on Netflix June 22, 2018

Continue Reading

Trending