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Movie Review: Christopher Robin Revives Winnie the Pooh

Charmaine Blake

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“It’s been a banner summer for crying. Some of the tears came from movies you’d expect, like one in which an eighth-grade girl struggles with her self-esteem. Other times, they were sneak-attack snivels, like when a movie-musical sequel based on the songs of ABBA triggered four different tear-jerking moments, one of which had me stifling an audible shriek-sob.

Anyone who saw the trailer for Disney’s new Christopher Robin film, which gives Winnie the Pooh and his friends in the Hundred Acre Wood the Paddington treatment, probably expected to have their heart strings plucked a bit. This movie gives them a full-blast bluegrass strum.

That’s one willy, nilly, silly, old, emotionally devastating bear.

Maybe its because were all feeling a bit brittle lately. There are Heffalumps and Woozles at every terrifying turn in todays world. We could use an old friend to help fight them off and feel safe again.

Christopher Robin is written by Allison Schroeder (Hidden Figures), Tom McCarthy (Spotlight), and Alex Ross Perry (Listen Up Philip), directed by Marc Forster (Finding Neverland), and of course, inspired by the characters of A.A. Milne and Ernest Shepard. Its a veritable Avengers of emotional storytelling. Together, they prove that feelings are still movies most valuable special effect. (Though the special effects used to animate these characters is pretty darned impressive, too.)

When we meet up with our old friends, the animals are gathered for a farewell party for young Christopher Robin, who will soon be going off to boarding school. A clever narrative device then makes…………..”

Read more: https://www.thedailybeast.com/christopher-robin-revives-winnie-the-pooh-as-an-emotional-terrorist

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Widows Movie Review

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Movie“Widows”

Director: Steve McQueen
Year: 2018
Rating: R
Running Time: 2 hours, 9 minutes

“When her husband Harry is killed in a robbery gone wrong, Veronica Rawlings is forced into committing a crime to get back the $2 million her husband stole from a dangerous politician/gangster during their fatal botched heist.

There’s no reason why ladies can’t be heisters, too, so why has it taken so long to give them a good and proper vehicle like “Widows”?…okay, don’t count “Ocean’s 8” from earlier this year, but still, it’s 2018, damn it! We should have dozens of these movies by now. This film is directed by Steve McQueen, who has directed films like “Shame,” “Hunger,” and the Oscar-winning “12 Years a Slave.” McQueen also helped write the screenplay along with acclaimed writer Gillian Flynn, and it is adapted from the British miniseries of the same name by Lynda La Plante. When career criminal Harry Rawlings (Liam Neeson) and his team steal $2 million from a local politician and crime boss named Jamal Manning (Brain Tyree Henry), they are all killed and get burned up with the money when their van explodes in a violent shootout with local Chicago police officers.

Now, Manning wants his money back, and he believes that debt falls to Harry’s widow Veronica (Viola Davis). Harry has left Veronica with little means to pay Manning back. When Jamal and his brother Jatemme (Daniel Kaluuya) come collecting, Veronica must gather the other widows of the men killed in the botched heist, Linda (Michelle Rodriguez), Alice (Elizabeth Debicki) and Amanda (Carrie Coon), to do the last job Harry had in his notebook, which he left for her to find. This final task will net them enough money to pay off Manning and allow them to start new lives for themselves……………………………….”

Read More Here:  https://www.lololovesfilms.com/2018/10/movie-review-widows-2018.html

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They Shall Not Grow Old Movie Review

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Jackson has restored, colourised and added voices to footage of the western front, bringing the soldiers unforgettably back to life

“To mark the centenary of the first world wars end, Peter Jackson has created a visually staggering thought experiment; an immersive deep-dive into what it was like for ordinary British soldiers on the western front. This he has done using state-of-the-art digital technology to restore flickery old black-and-white archive footage of the servicemens life in training and in the trenches. He has colourised it, sharpened it, put it in 3D and, as well as using diaries and letters for narrative voiceover, he has used lip-readers to help dub in what the men are actually saying.

The effect is electrifying. The soldiers are returned to an eerie, hyperreal kind of life in front of our eyes, like ghosts or figures summoned up in a seance. The faces are unforgettable.

Watching this, I understood how the world wars of the 20th century are said to have inspired surrealism. Thirty or so years ago, there was a debate in film circles about the sacrilege of colourising classic black-and-white movies. This is different. The colourisation effect is artificial, as is 3D (as is monochrome, too, of course), and the painterly approximation of reality presents a challenge to what you consider real on film. After a few minutes, I realised that force of cultural habit was causing me to doubt what I was seeing, because colour means modern. The colourisation, and everything else, is a kind of alienation shock tactic as well as a means of enfolding you in the experience. It is an indirect way of reminding you that this really did happen to people like you and me.

They Shall Not Grow Old is arguably limited in scope: it is just about the western front and there is nothing about the German point of view, or about the war elsewhere…………………………………….”

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/oct/16/they-shall-not-grow-old-review-first-world-war-peter-jackson

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Apostle review exhilarating Netflix horror is a wild, gory surprise

Charmaine Blake

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Gareth Evans, director of The Raid, shocks and confounds with an ultra-violent tale of a mad prophet that transforms into something entirely unexpected

“Apostle, director Gareth Evans first feature-length effort since his pair of The Raid action films achieved instant underground infamy, is that rarest of treats: a horror movie that starts out as one thing, and finishes having mutated into another.

Exhilarating to watch and tricky to write about, similar to such films as The Box and the more recent Annihilation, going beyond surprising its audience with mere twists, instead shaking its own constructed reality off its axis. A full shift occurs not just in tone, with suspense boiling over into scalding insanity, but in the narrative mode, as the established set of unspoken rules governing the universe get violently upended. As soon as the viewer believes theyve got a grip on what sort of horror story theyre in for, Evans demonstrates that in the chaotic universe contained within his camera, anything can happen. And just about everything does; Evanss maximalist more-is-more ethic piles on one Grand Guignol spectacle after another, building to an operatic, hallucinatory climax that leaves our puny reason behind for a metaphysical nirvana. Polarizing yet undeniably fascinating, the bait-and-switch horror film lures its viewer into a false sense of terrified security before pouncing in an anything-goes frenzy, and Evanss latest is a prime specimen.

For the first hour, hed like you to believe youve wandered into a particularly reverent Wicker Man homage, and he makes the legwork of setting…………………………..”

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/oct/10/apostle-review-gareth-evans-exhilarating-netflix-horror-is-a-wild-gory-surprise

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