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Netflix exec says 85 percent of new spending will go towards original content

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“In case you had any doubts that original content is a big priority at Netflix, Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos estimated that 85 percent of the company’s total spending is going to new shows and movies.

That’s according to Variety, which reported on Sarandos’ remarks today at MoffettNathanson’s Media & Communications Summit 2018 in New York. He also said Netflix has a 470 originals scheduled to premiere between now and the end of the year, bringing the total up to around 1,000.

It’s probably not surprising that the service is prioritizing originals. After all, Netflix seems to be highlighting a new one every time I open it up, and competitors like Apple, Amazon and Hulu are ramping up their own spending.

But the depth of Netflix’s library, which is achieved by licensing content from others, has always seemed like a strength — in fact, a recent study found that licensed content generates 80 percent of Netflix viewing in the United States.

Part of the context here is that many of the studios that have sold their content to Netflix in the past are now either saving it for their own streaming services or looking to raise the prices.

And while movies account for one-third of viewing on Netflix, Sarandos pointed to new, big budget titles as one area where it no longer makes sense for the streaming service to spend a ton of money — because if you really want to catch the latest blockbuster, you probably already saw it in theaters.

“We said, maybe we can put the billion dollars we’d put in an output deal into original films,” he said.

Sarandos also sees an opportunity to develop more unscripted content like Queer Eye, and to sign big deals with high-profile showrunners like Shonda Rhimes and Ryan Murphy.

Netflix had previously projected that it would spend $7 billion to $8 billion on content this year. And just today, Netflix announced that it’s renewing Lost in Space for a second season (we were fans of season one) and picked up 10 After Midnight, a horror anthology series from Shape of Water director Guillermo del Toro.”

Read more: https://techcrunch.com/2018/05/14/netflix-original-content-spending/

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‘The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society is basically an episode of ‘Downton Abbey’

Charmaine Blake

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Image: netflix

“Right this very instant, somewhere out there the Downton Abbey movie is being made. Perhaps the Crawley family is having a hushed conversation as cameras circle in. Or maybe the cast and crew are on a dainty craft services break!

Regardless, the Downton Abbey movie is happening. And we have no release date.

Lucky for those of us with 20th century England fantasies that need tending, Netflix’s new film The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society is a two-hour episode of Downton Abbey—figuratively speaking—based on Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows’ book of the same name.

Set in the years following World War II, the film follows the lives of members of a book club formed during the German occupation of Guernsey, an island in the English Channel off the coast of Normandy. Overwhelmed by the bleak and oppressive realities of Nazi presence, residents of the island begin secretly meeting to add some much needed levity and love to their days, creating the “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society” book club in the process.

However, the formation of the club is not the film’s main focus. The true star of the story is found in writer Juliet Ashton, portrayed by the illustrious Lily James—and known to many as Downton‘s Lady Rose MacClare……………”

Read more: https://mashable.com/2018/08/14/guernsey-literay-potato-peel-pie-netflix-lily-james/

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Netflix Stuff

Iron Fist Season 2 Trailer – Netflix

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It’s not a weapon to be held. It’s a weapon to be used.
Season 2 of Marvel’s Iron Fist debuts exclusively on Netflix September 7, 2018.

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Is Netflix the new king of stand-up comedy?

Charmaine Blake

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(CNN)For fans of stand-up comedy, this decade has been a dream come true.

“That’s because more stand-up is available to watch now than there has been in years. It’s largely due to Netflix, which has poured millions into expanding its library of stand-up specials.
While longtime stalwarts such as HBO and Comedy Central have dialed back their investments in stand-up, Netflix has opened up its checkbook.
Netflix has largely gone unchallenged on the streaming front, but that battle will soon reach a fever pitch. HBO is being pressured to expand its library to compete against Netflix (CNN and HBO are both owned by WarnerMedia), Amazon Studios is growing and investing more into original programming and, arguably the biggest threat of all, Disney’s streaming service is set to launch next year.
Continuing to build up an arsenal of original content to separate themselves from the competition could be the key to winning the war.
Netflix has made a bold choice to double down on stand-up. While the company was founded in 1997, it didn’t start producing original content until 2012. Meanwhile, the legacy video giants that it has challenged in the stand-up space have been producing specials for decades.
It may be a big bet for Netflix, but it’s a proven strategy.
“If you look at the history of relatively new channels, they often go early into stand-up,” says Jason Zinoman, comedy critic for The New York Times. “HBO invested in stand-up early in the ’70s. Stand-up is cheap, and you can get a huge amount of attention for something that only requires a microphone stand and one employee.”
Another reason to focus on stand-up, says Jonas Larsen, executive vice president and co-head of talent and development for Comedy Central, is star power.
“On one hand, to be able to put Jerry Seinfeld or Chris Rock on a billboard and a bus and have the Netflix logo next to it, it drives subscribers so it makes sense,” says Larsen. “It’s almost like marketing dollars that they’re paying for content because it’s marketing their brand. So maybe it makes sense for them to spend that kind of money to get the press.”
More important than adding subscribers is retaining them.
Over the years, Netflix has gathered……………..”

Read more: https://www.cnn.com/2018/08/13/entertainment/netflix-standup-comedy-central-hbo-chappelle-rock/index.html

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