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Netflix raising prices in the U.S. for the first time in two years

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Netflix is raising the price for its most popular U.S. video streaming plan by 10 percent— a move that could boost its profits but slow the subscriber growth that drives its stock price.

The change announced Thursday affects most of Netflix’s 53 million U.S. subscribers.

WHAT GOES UP

Netflix will now charge $11 per month instead of $10 for a plan that includes HD and allows up people to simultaneously watch programs on two different internet-connected devices.

The price for another plan that includes ultra-high definition, or 4K, video, is going up by 17 percent, to $14 from $12 a month. A plan that limits subscribers to one screen at a time without high-definition will remain at $8 a month.

The increase would be the first in two years for Netflix, although it won’t seem that way for millions of subscribers. That’s because Netflix temporarily froze its rates for long-time subscribers the last two times it raised its prices, delaying the most recent increases until the second half of last year for them.

Netflix isn’t giving anyone a break this time around. It will start emailing notifications about the new prices to affected subscribers Oct. 19, giving them 30 days to accept the higher rates, switch to a cheaper plan or cancel the service.

WHY PRICES ARE RISING

The price increase are being driven by Netflix’s desire to fatten its profit margins as it spends more money to finance a critically acclaimed slate of original programming that includes shows such as “House of Cards,” ”Orange Is The New Black,” ”Stranger Things,” and “The Crown.”

Those series’ success helped Netflix land more Emmy award nominations than any TV network besides HBO this year. It’s also the main reason Netflix’s U.S. audience has nearly doubled since the February 2013 debut of “House of Cards” kicked off its expansion into original programming.

But paying for exclusive TV series and films hasn’t been cheap. Netflix expects to spend $6 billion a year alone on programming this year, and the expenses are likely to rise as it competes against streaming rivals such as Amazon, Hulu, YouTube and, potentially, Apple for the rights to future shows and movies.

Both Amazon (at $99 per year, or about $8.25 per month) and Hulu ($10 per month) now offer lower prices than Netflix.

POSSIBILITY OF BACKLASH

Netflix believes its price rate is justified by recent service improvements, such as a feature that allows people to download shows onto phones or other devices to watch them offline.

But Netflix subscribers have rebelled against price increases in the past, most notably in 2011 when the company stopped bundling its streaming service with its DVD-by-mail service, resulting in price increases of as much as 60 percent for customers who wanted both plans. Netflix lost 600,000 subscribers and its stock price plummeted by 80 percent in the subsequent backlash. The company rebounded strongly, though, propelling its stock from a split-adjusted low of $7.54 in 2012 to about $184 now.

And Netflix blamed a temporary slowdown in subscriber growth last year on the lifting of its price freeze on long-time customers who decided to drop the service rather than pay slightly more money.

Wedbush Securities analyst Michael Wedbush believes less than 10 percent of current subscribers will cancel Netflix as price rise again, but he predicts it will be tougher to attract new customers who will choose cheaper alternatives from Amazon or Hulu.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2017/10/05/netflix-raising-prices-in-u-s-for-first-time-in-two-years.html

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Like Father – Netflix Movie Trailer

Charmaine Blake

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Starring Kelsey Grammer & Kristen Bell
When a workaholic young executive (Kristen Bell), is left at the altar, she ends up on her Caribbean honeymoon cruise with the last person she ever expected: her estranged and equally workaholic father (Kelsey Grammer). The two depart as strangers, but over the course of a few adventures, a couple of umbrella-clad cocktails and a whole lot of soul-searching, they return with a renewed appreciation for family and life. Like Father premieres August 3 only on Netflix.

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Netflix’s ‘Lust Stories’ is Indian filmmaking at its finest

Charmaine Blake

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“As Indian cinema’s worldwide audience grows, most people are acquainted exclusively with Bollywood – Hindi-language romantic dramas full of dazzling song-and-dance numbers that may or may not be related to plot.

But Indian cinema has always been more than that, just as Italian film extends beyond neorealism or and the French New Wave is just one piece of a rich history. Cinephiles may know Satyajit Ray’s Apu trilogy, which offers a glimpse of the type of gritty auteurship that doesn’t pay the Bollywood bills, but speaks to some truly fine artistry. Indian short films remain a source of this ingenuity and excellence, and Netflix’s Lust Stories is a fresh new installment.

Like Bombay Talkies before it, Lust Stories is an anthology of short films from known Indian directors Anurag Kashyap, Zoya Akhtar, Dibakar Banerjee, and Karan Johar. They are exceedingly simple stories: a teacher’s obsession with…..”

Read more: https://mashable.com/2018/06/16/netflix-lust-stories/

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Netflixs latest hit The Kissing Booth is a Wattpad success story

Charmaine Blake

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“One of the most popular movies in the U.S. is a terrible teen rom-com called “The Kissing Booth,” and it’s not in theaters. Instead, this Netflix Original with its paltry 17 percent critics’ score on Rotten Tomatoes, shot up to become the No. 4 movie on IMDb, before more recently dropping down to No. 9. Its leads, Jacob Elordi and Joey King, also became the No. 1 and No. 6 most popular stars on IMDb’s StarMeter, respectively, shortly after the film’s launch.

The secret to the movie’s success, however, is not just a combination of teenagers’ questionable taste in entertainment and the power of Netflix’s distribution — though both play a major role, clearly.

Instead, it’s that “The Kissing Booth” is tapping into a built-in audience: teenage Wattpad users.

Yes, Wattpad.

In case you’re not familiar, Wattpad is an online site…..”

Read more: https://techcrunch.com/2018/06/14/netflixs-latest-hit-the-kissing-booth-is-a-wattpad-success-story/

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