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New Movie Reviews

Netflix’s ‘Someone Great’ is a coming-of-age rom-com for twenty-somethings

Charmaine Blake

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“When Rolling Stone calls, aspiring music journalist Jenny (Gina Rodriguez) knows you have to answer even if it means moving across the country to San Francisco and jeopardizing her relationship with Nate (Lakeith Stanfield), her boyfriend of nine years.

In Netflix original Someone Great, Jenny is left heartbroken when Nate decides they should end the relationship. In hopes of leaving New York City with better final memories, Jenny gets together with her two best friends Erin (DeWanda Wise) and Blair (Brittany Snow)to have one last hurrah at the exclusive Neon Classic concert.

Someone Great

RELEASE DATE: 4/19/2019
DIRECTOR: Jennifer Kaytin Robinson
STREAMING: Netflix
The coming-of-age film explores turning 30 and saying goodbye to people and places that no longer belong in your life.

Someone Great tells a tale about life transitions and the growing pains that come with getting older. Its a coming-of-age story for twenty-somethings; its about turning 30, transitioning out of your twenties, and saying goodbye to people and places that no longer belong in your life. Someone Great is heart-wrenching because its relatable and challenges viewers with the concept that sometimes the best decision for yourself is the hardest one to make…………………………………………………………..”

Read more: https://www.dailydot.com/upstream/someone-great-netflix-review/

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New Movie Reviews

Stranger Things Season 3 receives Rave Reviews from Critics

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New Movie Reviews

Midsommar Review – 5 Stars!

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Florence Pugh is plunged into a terrifying pagan bacchanal in a magnificent folk-horror tale from Hereditary director Ari Aster

“There’s nothing cosy about these midsummer murders, and Midsommar could turn out to be folk-horror for the Fyre festival age. Ari Aster is the film-maker who made his feature debut just last year with the chiller Hereditary, and now presents us with this fantastically sinister and self-aware Euro-bacchanal, clearly inspired by the 1973 classic The Wicker Man. And that is not the only riff. When Hereditary came out, I guessed (correctly, as it turned out) that the director was thinking about Bergman’s Cries and Whispers. I’m now going to bet 20p that before shooting Midsommar, Aster took another look at Tarkovsky’s The Sacrifice.

Midsommar is an outrageous black-comic carnival of agony, starring charismatic Florence Pugh in a comely robe and floral headdress. It features funny-tasting pies and chorally assisted ritual sex, with pagan celebrants gazing into the middle distance and warbling as solemnly as the young dudes in the Coca-Cola TV ad about teaching the world to sing. It’s all set in an eerily beautiful sunlit plain, bounded by forests and lakes. This is supposed to be somewhere in northern Sweden, but was filmed in Hungary, and Aster, cinematographer Pawel Pogorzelski and production designer Henrik Svensson have collaborated on what are surely digitally assisted images: the sky and fields becoming a bouquet of vivid and beautiful blues and greens. The music from British composer Bobby Krlic (AKA the Haxan Cloak) is sensually creepy………………………”

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What’s My Name: Muhammad Ali review – from prodigy to legend

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Part one of Antoine Fuqua’s film shows the transformation within a decade from 12-year-old boxing novice Cassius Clay into the heavyweight champion of the world

“I asked my mother when I went to church on Sunday: ‘Why is everything white? What happened to all the black angels?’”

So Muhammad Ali told an interviewer, before giving a knowing look and – boom! – the punchline. “Black angels are in the kitchen preparing milk and honey.”

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