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Sandra Bullock on All-female Casts

Charmaine Blake

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We deserve 14 more movies with these ladies together, at the very least.

Image: warner bros.

“Male actors probably don’t even take note of being part of an all-male cast. For actresses, though, its still a rare privilege — and Ocean’s 8 star Sandra Bullock thinks that’s a whole lotta bullshit.

In an interview with People, Bullock was asked about getting to work with the all-female cast of a lifetime. Ocean’s 8 stars a true smorgasbord of the baddest ladies in entertainment: Sandra Bullock, Cate Blanchett, Mindy Kaling, Sarah Paulson, Anne Hathaway, Helena Bonham Carter, Awkwafina, and none other than Rihanna herself.

When asked about the experience of working with such an enviable all-female cast, Bullock spoke the truth:

“It felt like it was a long time coming. Too long if you ask me — which you did — but I’m just so grateful that it happened. It felt like we had all been kept in solitary confinement from each other. Kind of like an ‘actress quarantine’ and when we all found ourselves like sardines in the trailer that first day, it was like the dam burst and we all made up for lost time.”

Oh to be a fly on the wall in the room where these women get to just hang out and enjoy each other’s company.

Ocean’s 8 follows the story of Debbie Ocean, the sister of Danny Ocean from the original Ocean’s 11. She gets a rock star gang of professional thieves together to steal a $150 million necklace from the Met Gala.

Bullock couldn’t say enough about how special it felt to work alongside this cast. “I saw a group of women support each other in the most humbling way. Everyone wanting the other to ‘have their moment,’” she said.

But that camaraderie was completely twisted by tabloids. “Early on in the shoot we started reading…”

Read more: https://mashable.com/2018/05/03/sandra-bullock-oceans-8-all-female-cast/

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A Guide to Finding Your Ideal Movie Ticket Subscription

Charmaine Blake

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“A year ago today, MoviePass introduced a radical new business model: Go see a movie a day, every day, for just $10 per month. At the time, it seemed too good to be true. As it turns out, it was.

The company has since burned through cash at an unsustainable rate, aggravating customers with limited screenings, punishing anti-fraud measures, and general uncertainty about the future. Today, in a bid to stay afloat, MoviePass officially abandoned its unlimited buffet. It still costs $10 a month, but that now gets you three tickets instead of 30, and often not to the showtimes you’d prefer.

Plenty has been written already about what went wrong, and what could still go right. But the most important lesson of MoviePass’ wild first year? Movie ticket subscriptions are here to stay. Even if MoviePass eventually goes under—or if you’re just ready to bail—enough similar services have cropped up over the last year that one likely has a combination of cost and convenience that suits you just fine. Here’s what each one offers, and who it might work best for……………”

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The Real Reason The Meg Feasted at the Box Office

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“Late last week, it seemed as though the very expensive, very Stathamy underwater thriller The Meg was on its way to becoming a dead shark. Even though the film—an adaptation of the 1997 novel by Steve Alten—had an online fanbase more than 20 years old, most predictions pointed toward a relatively low opening weekend at the box office. For a movie with a megalodon-sized $150 million estimated budget, this was ominous news. So were the The Meg‘s mostly meh reviews.

By Sunday night, however, the movie had become one of the year’s few Hollywood surprise stories, making $45 million in one of the highest debuts of the year. That turnout helped obliterate the weekend’s other long-in-the-works thriller: Slender Man, the adaptation(?) of a nearly 10-year-old meme that originated in the world of web-borne urban legends known as “creepypasta.” Slender Man earned far less than The Meg, making about $10 million. That was better than expected for a barely marketed schlock thriller. But it will likely disappear from theaters soon, considering its damning D– grade on audience-reaction tracker CinemaScore. To get an idea of how uniquely calamitous that is, consider that 2015’s Fantastic Four—a movie that actually ends with this scene—wound up a mere C– score.

Both The Meg and Slender Man are, in their own ways, “internet movies,” a hazy descriptor that can be applied to any film with a uniquely nutty prerelease relationship with the web. Internet movies tend to fall within two categories: The majority are like The Meg, which was embraced online in the weeks or months (or even decades) before its arrival. A film like Slender Man is far rarer, as it works in reverse…………….”

Read more: https://www.wired.com/story/the-meg-slender-man-internet-movies/

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Robert Redford’s greatest screen roles ranked!

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As the actor and Oscar-winning director reveals his plans for retirement, we rank his 10 best performances in front of the camera

10. Brubaker (1980)

“Released in the same year as his clunky but multiple Oscar-winning directorial debut Ordinary People, Brubaker showed a tougher side to Redford than anyone had seen before. As a prison warden who goes undercover as an inmate to clean up the penal system, he had to raise his game among some hardened character actors. The movies I liked making dealt with an America that was a little different from the America that was propagandised, he said. Theres a grey zone that I know, and I want to tell stories about that complex part of America.

9. The Twilight Zone Nothing in the Dark (1962)

None of Redfords early TV appearances were as haunting as his personification of death in this creepy-sad episode of The Twilight Zone. You see? he says, glowing handsomely and gesturing to an old womans dormant body as he leads her spirit into the afterlife. No shock. No engulfment. No tearing asunder. What you feared would come like an explosion is like a whisper. What you thought was the end is the beginning.

8. The Great Gatsby (1974)

Before DiCaprio there was Redford: he may never have exuded the pure electricity of the junior actor, and his chemistry with Mia Farrow (as Daisy) was meagre, to say the least, but his permanently distracted air was just right for Jay Gatsby. In the midst of even the most vibrant shindig, he seems uniquely alone. Fame does that to you.

7. Sneakers (1992)

This underrated techno caper-comedy, about a crack team of computer security experts, was led by Redford and features River Phoenix, Sidney Poitier and Dan Aykroyd. Redfords occasional returns to light comedy could be spotty Legal Eagles should be outlawed but hes having a blast here as the slightly bumbling former radical who has become something of a sellout.

Redford
Redford in The Great Gatsby (1974). Photograph: Everett Collection/Rex

6. Three Days of the Condor (1975)

Redfords most frequent collaborator was the director Sydney Pollack, with whom he made six films including the 1972 western Jeremiah Johnson and the Oscar-bait drama Out of Africa (1985). Their best, though, was this jittery conspiracy thriller in which Redford, working for a clandestine CIA group, has to be brought in from the cold after his team is massacred. Cherish the justified sense of Watergate-era dread, as well as the opening shot of Redford cycling through traffic in a goofy woolly hat and trainers…………….”

See the rest of the list here: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/aug/09/robert-redfords-greatest-screen-roles-ranked

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