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Sorry to Bother You Movie Review

Charmaine Blake

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“In Boots Riley’s trippy new film Sorry to Bother You, hunger is the main throughline. The hunger for truth. The hunger for justice. The hunger to succeed personally, and even more so in one’s professional life. At RegalView, a low-level telemarketing firm in Oakland, one path to success presents itself in the form of code-switching. The disaffected Cassius Green (LaKeith Stanfield) is hungry to prove himself.

He’s a damaged soul eager for anything other than failure and hardship. On the advice of a coworker (Danny Glover), Cassius begins to use a “white voice” when speaking with prospective customers—what white people “wished they sounded like,” Glover explains—and its pay-off is immediate. Cassius becomes the company’s top salesman, earning the title of “Power Caller” and a promotion upstairs, where it’s required he talk in his white voice at all times.

But professional advancement comes with a moral clause. Cassius is wedged between doing what is right and what is profitable; one reason he took the job in the first place was to help his uncle save his home, which was in foreclosure. These are questions of survival Riley is volleying at us—what, exactly, are you willing to give up for the American Dream? Your friends? Your principles? For someone like Cassius, there are always conditions to Making It. For black people, in particular, success has its own fine print.

Sorry to Bother You is a deliciously untame thing: an allegorical satire about the exploitation of labor and land. (It joins a cohort of black futurity coming to the screen in recent years, including Get Out by Jordan Peele and Random Acts of Flyness, which debuts in August on HBO; Nnedi Okorafor’s Who Fears Death is……”

Read more: https://www.wired.com/story/sorry-to-bother-you-review/

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Mission: Impossible Fallout Is the Most Spectacular Action Film in Years

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“Tom Cruise takes the title of his Mission: Impossible franchise as a literal challenge. With each successive installment, Cruise attempts to demonstrate that no classic set piece cant be topped and that, no matter his advancing age (56), he can keep ignoring (if not outright fighting) Father Time to pull off ever-greater acts of stuntman insanity, at crazy risk to his personal safety. Thats never more true than with Fallout, his sixth outing as covert agent Ethan Hunt, which reconfirms that his inspired-by-TV endeavor is still the greatest blockbuster saga around, and that hes Hollywoods premiere action-adventure Peter Pan, an actor whoregardless of his spottier track record as of lateis right at home in this world of spies, masks and self-destructing messages. Determined to perpetually raise the bar for both the series and himself, Cruise again proves, with his latest, that both of those seemingly impossible feats is possible.

Fallout is the best action film since Mad Max: Fury Road, and its unique in the big-screen history of Mission: Impossible, in that its the first episode to be helmed by a return directorChristopher McQuarrie, who spearheaded 2015s stellar Rogue Nation. For an undertaking once defined by its shifting personalitythanks to each entry being a stand-alone effort from a distinctive auteur (Brian De Palma, John Woo, J.J. Abrams, Brad Bird)the decision to reenlist McQuarrie signifies that Cruise has settled on a signature voice for his series. Not only does McQuarrie deliver the same style of grand, vigorous mayhem that he did before, but working as sole screenwriter, he also turns Fallout into a legitimate sequel to its immediate predecessor, continuing the story he began three years agowhile additionally, in one key respect, referencing Abrams Mission: Impossible III.

The decision to go back to McQuarrie does negate the thrill of discovering a new aesthetic and tone, which up until now has been a Mission: Impossible hallmark. Nonetheless, whats gained is far greatera refinement of McQuarries superb action form. Fallout features more astounding set pieces than can be found in the rest of 2018s summer crop combined, all of which escalate with such mounting electricity that its hard to catch ones breath. The directors stunning widescreen visuals (even more impressive in IMAX, whose outsized format is repeatedly exploited) enhance the magnificence of his scripting and staging, in which initially straightforward scenarios become complicated by a raft of unforeseen events, until the tension is almost too much to bear. In terms of providing a pure adrenalized rush, almost no contemporaries are in its league.

That Cruises Hunt routinely responds to surprising situations with Ill figure it out only amplifies the anxious anticipation of…….”

Read more: https://www.thedailybeast.com/mission-impossible-fallout-is-the-most-spectacular-action-film-in-years

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Skyscraper Review: The Rock Towers Over an Inferno of Cliches

Charmaine Blake

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A silly yet watchable action movie sees the worlds most bankable star try to save his family from a building full of fire, terrorists and clunky dialogue

“When the first footage from Skyscraper was launched earlier this year, most online conversation revolved around the staggering incredulity of the trailers money shot: Dwayne The Rock Johnson making an Ethan Hunt-esque leap from a crane into the broken window of a building. Everyone from math professors to meme makers critiqued the physics, and even Johnson snappily responded on Twitter. But for me, the most unlikely element was the inclusion of Johnson himself. How on earth does the wrestler-turned-actor find the time to headline so many damn movies? Does he sleep? Has he undergone a Multiplicity-like experimental cloning procedure?

Because in the last seven months he managed to game a winning $962m worldwide from a belated Jumanji sequel and turn the arcade adaptation Rampage into…….”

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/jul/10/skyscraper-review-the-rock-towers-over-an-inferno-of-cliches

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‘The First Purge’ Movie Review

Charmaine Blake

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The fourth chapter in the often inventive yet shoddily written franchise, where crime is legal once a year, delivers an unpleasant, visceral assault with uneven results

“Theres something almost great about the Purge movies. Unlike so many other recent horror franchises, the creatives involved flirt with larger socio-political issues as well as providing the murderous mayhem that genre fans crave. The nifty, troubling concept, that sees all crime legalized for one 12-hour period a year, has allowed for a number of entry points for conversations about class, race and capitalism. Yet still, not one of the three films thus far has managed to take this combination of grisly nihilism and bleak social commentary and turn it into something that truly soars.

After 2016s The Purge: Election Year, the most overtly political entry yet, the story is going back to the beginning to trace the decision-making process that led to the inception of the tradition. With America in a believably fraught state (the introductory montage informs us of rising unemployment, mass opioid addiction and an escalating mortgage crisis), the presiding party, the nationalist, ultra-religious New Founding Fathers of America, develops an idea that could potentially reduce skyrocketing crime rates: what if everything was legal for half a day, once a year? Would the annual release of anger and violence lead to criminal abstinence for the remaining 364 and a half days?

To test out their thesis, a pilot scheme is arranged for those living on Staten Island. If citizens dont want to get involved they can leave for the night but for those willing to stay, theres a financial benefit and, inevitably, the experiment attracts those within poorer communities. But while psychologist Dr May Updale (Marisa Tomei) predicts that it will be a cathartic release of hate and violence, in actuality, residents mostly choose to party instead. Human nature does not obey the laws of politics, she says. For those in charge, this isnt good enough and to achieve the desired result, they send in trained killers to stir up trouble. Local crime boss Dmitri (Insecures YLan Noel) and his childhood friend, activist Nya (Superflys Lex Scott Davis) are then forced to defend their neighborhood and survive the night.

As patchy as the series may have been, theres still something admirably dogged in writer-director James DeMonacos attempts to expand not only the Purge universe but the mythology embedded within it. Such fan service is…..”

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/jul/03/the-first-purge-review-patchy-dour-prequel-is-a-nihilistic-trumpian-horror

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