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Tarantino responds to Uma Thurman crash claim: ‘The biggest regret of my life’

Charmaine Blake

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Quentin Tarantino has given his version of events during the making of Kill Bill, which Thurman has described as dehumanisation to the point of death

Tarantino responds to Uma Thurman crash claim: ‘The biggest regret of my life’

Quentin Tarantino has given his version of events during the making of Kill Bill, which Thurman has described as dehumanisation to the point of death

Quentin Tarantino has responded to allegations that he forced actor Uma Thurman into unsafe working conditions during the filming of Kill Bill, calling his decision to get her to perform a stunt the biggest regret of my life.

Thurman accused the writer and director known for his ultra-violent films, including Pulp Fiction, Reservoir Dogs, Death Proof and the Kill Bill series of bullying her during filming into driving an unsafe car that then crashed, calling the incident dehumanisation to the point of death.

I am guilty, for putting her in that car, but not the way that people are saying I am guilty of it, Tarantino told Deadline, claiming that nobody in the filming team that day considered the drive a stunt. It was just driving. None of us looked at it as a stunt. Maybe we should have, but we didnt. Im sure when it was brought up to me, that I rolled my eyes and was irritated. But Im sure I wasnt in a rage and I wasnt livid.

Tarantino supported Thurmans assertions that he had asked her to drive at a particular speed so that her hair would be blowing. At the last minute, due to concerns about the light changing, the direction of the drive was reversed but the road was not tested in this direction before Thurman drove it, Tarantino said.

I told her it would be OK. I told her the road was a straight line. I told her it would be safe. And it wasnt. I was wrong. I didnt force her into the car. She got into it because she trusted me. And she believed me.

On the same day that Tarantino tried to address the resulting criticism, audio also emerged of him apparently defending fellow director Roman Polanskis sexual assault of a 13-year-old in 1977, saying she was down with it and that rape was a buzzword that didnt apply to the situation.

In a 2003 interview with Howard Stern, Tarantino said of Polanski: He didnt rape a 13-year-old. It was statutory rape … he had sex with a minor. Thats not rape. To me, when you use the word rape, youre talking about violent, throwing them down its like one of the most violent crimes in the world … Throwing the word rape around is like throwing the word racist around. It doesnt apply to everything people use it for … She wanted to have [sex]! Dated the guy!

Tarantino told the New York Times in October last year that, with regard to the alleged misconduct of film producer Harvey Weinstein: I knew enough to do more than I did … I wish I had taken responsibility for what I heard.

Quentin
Quentin Tarantino: I told her it would be safe. And it wasnt. I was wrong. Photograph: Paul Zimmerman/WireImage

Tarantino also claimed that it wasnt until Thurman told him about her own alleged assault at the hands of Weinstein, which paralleled an experience of Tarantinos then-girlfriend Mira Sorvino, that he realised there was a pattern to Weinsteins luring and pushing attacks. He claims he made doing Kill Bill with Miramax conditional on Weinstein apologising to Thurman.

I wasnt giving Harvey the benefit of the doubt, Tarantino said. I knew he was lying, that everything Uma was saying was the truth. When he tried to wriggle out of it, and how things actually happened, I never bought his story. I said, I dont believe you. I believe her. And if you want to do Kill Bill, you need to make this right.

The crash affected his relationship with Thurman for years. It wasnt like we didnt talk. But a trust was broken, he said.

Tarantino agreed with the suggestion that Thurman had been denied access to footage of the crash in order to prevent her from suing, but said he hadnt been aware she thought he was complicit in that. He said he supplied the footage to Thurman in advance of the New York Times interview because he wanted to make things right.

There was an element of closure. She had been denied it, from Harvey Weinstein, being able to even see the footage. I wanted to deliver it to her, so she could look at it. So she could see it and help her with her memory of the incident.

The director also responded to suggestions that he personally performed some of the more controversial and violent actions in his films, including spitting on Thurmans face and choking her with a chain, by explaining that it was a matter of taking responsibility for tricky shots. He detailed an incident during the filming of Inglourious Basterds in which he asked actor Diana Kruger whether he could personally strangle her in order to get the right shot.

That was an issue of me asking the actress, can we do this to get a realistic effect, he said. And she agreed with it, she knew it would look good and she trusted me to do it. I would ask a guy the same thing. In fact, I would probably be more insistent with a guy.

Weinstein has denied assaulting Thuman, as well as all claims of non-consensual sex made against him.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/feb/06/tarantino-responds-to-uma-thurman-crash-claim

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Keira Knightley to star in forgotten story of Iraq war whistleblower

Charmaine Blake

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Actress will take role of Katharine Gun, who leaked an email to the Observer about US spying plans, in new film

 

Keira Knightley to star in forgotten story of Iraq war whistleblower

Actress will take role of Katharine Gun, who leaked an email to the Observer about US spying plans, in new film

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/feb/18/keira-knightley-role-katharine-gun-gchq-official-secrets-film

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Feast your hungry eyes on Chadwick Boseman’s Rolling Stone cover

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Just look at that smile.

Image: Leon Bennett/Getty Images

It’s now been a week since Black Panther blasted its way onto our screens, and thirst levels are officially off the charts.

Winston Duke, the jaw-droppingly chiselled actor who plays M’Baku in the film, has already had his fair share of Twitter attention — and now it’s Chadwick Boseman’s turn.

On Sunday, Boseman tweeted out his new Rolling Stone front cover. Brace yourselves…

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‘Black Panther’ posts a record-setting box office opening for Marvel

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Image: disney

Excited for Black Panther? So are we. Which is why we’re rolling out obsessive coverage with Black Panther Week.

We knew Black Panther would be a hit. And now, the box office figures are here to prove it.

The latest chapter in the Marvel Cinematic Universe opened with an estimated $218 million earned over the weekend, including Monday’s holiday. That’s enough to give King T’Challa’s adventures in Wakanda a second-place finish among all other MCU movie openings.

Black Panther‘s Friday-Saturday-Sunday opening accounts for an estimated $192 million. That’s just enough to secure an all time top-five finish among Friday-Saturday-Sunday opening weekends, behind Star Wars: The Force Awakens ($248 million), Star Wars: The Last Jedi ($220 million), Jurassic World ($208.8 million), and The Avengers ($207.4 million).

At least part of the sensational box office success is due to the fact that the movie dropped in February. The early months of the year are typically quiet ones for Hollywood, though risk-averse studios have more recently taken advantage of the period’s empty release calendar to showcase unproven blockbusters.

In 2016, that was Deadpool. The R-rated superhero movie was in many ways a first for the genre, proving that an adults-only audience could carry a comic book adaptation to box office success. Until Black Panther came along, Deadpool‘s $132.4 million opening weekend made it the all time winner for February releases.

Black Panther was considered “risky” — from a studio exec’s perspective, to be clear — for a different, and arguably more controversial, reason. Its predominantly black cast of stars and politicized themes fall outside the typical recipe of a successful Hollywood blockbuster, which tends to center around white male leads.

What’s more, the Black Panther character is among Marvel’s lesser-known heroes on the world stage. Any fan of Marvel comics would call foul on that, but stand, say, Spider-Man, or Wolverine, or Captain America up against Black Panther and there’s really no contest: One is a household name, the other isn’t.

This movie changes that. Buzz around Black Panther had been building for months. As the Feb. 16 release drew closer, all the usual background buzz about box office predictions grew on a weekly basis. At one point, Black Panther was on the road to a $150 million opening. Barely a day later, that number had climbed to $165 million.

To anyone paying attention, it was clear from not just the buzz but also the cultural movement building around the movie that it was going to be something special. Then, it screened for critics and reviews came out. That made things internet-official: Black Panther was a hit.

The numbers don’t lie. An estimated $192 million in three days. $218 million in four. Another $169 million from releases in countries outside the U.S., with many first-place weekend finishes among them. Black Panther is fully owning its moment.

Read more: https://mashable.com/2018/02/18/black-panther-box-office-opening-weekend/

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