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The 50 top films of 2017 in the US: No 3 Get Out

Charmaine Blake

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Jordan Peeles sleeper hit was a note-perfect dismantling of white American liberalism but it was also chilling, hilarious and relentlessly entertaining

It would be easy enough to make a case for Get Outs place among the years best movies simply by reeling off a list of stats and facts. To date, Jordan Peeles film has made over $175m at the US box office, a figure that puts it in the 15 highest-grossing films of 2017, ahead of the likes of Cars 3, War for the Planet of the Apes and the latest Transformers and Pirates of the Caribbean films. Globally it has earned back around 56 times its production budget (as a point of comparison, Beauty and the Beast, the years runaway hit, has earned around 10 times its budget), and has become the highest-grossing film of all time made by a black director.

Get Out currently holds a 99% rating on critical aggregation site Rotten Tomatoes, making it the best reviewed film of the year. (Much has been made of Lady Birds 100% rating, but Get Outs greater number of reviews means that it is still ahead in the end-of-year rankings.) To cap it all, the film looks likely to join a very select list of horror movies to earn a best picture nomination at the Oscars, with some predicting it could nay, should take home the top prize.

Yet Get Outs real impact was far more profound than that which showed up on balance sheets and end-of-year polls. This was the rare mainstream movie that mattered, a mass-market horror that forced its many viewers to confront head-on the most pressing topic in American life today. That it did so while offering up a thrillingly effective horror movie seems doubly sensational.

Daniel Kaluuya plays Chris, the black boyfriend taking the plunge of a first visit to the home of his white girlfriend Roses (Allison Williams) parents. They are on the face of it, well-meaning, if slightly embarrassing, in their desire to be seen as good progressives, boasting about voting for Obama, engaging in fist-bumps. Yet theres the occasional ringing of alarm bells: the comments by Roses brother about Chriss genetic makeup, the desire of Roses mother to hypnotise Chris, and the presence of black employees at the house, all of whose faces are frozen in a rictus grin of strained enthusiasm. Things inevitably go south from there, and soon were into territory situated somewhere between The Stepford Wives, Guess Whos Coming to Dinner and the malice of modern horror films such as It Follows.

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A thrillingly effective horror Get Out. Photograph: Allstar/Blumhouse Productions

It bears repeating that Peele could have taken the safe option and located his monster in the far fringes of modern-day racism, especially given that beasts reawakening this year. Instead he swung for the fences, and presented a far less palatable truth: that bigotry is just as present, albeit better hidden, among white liberals; the folks who rail against Trumps travel ban while committing the sort of small-scale acts of othering that prove so damaging to people of colour, death by a thousand microaggressions. It struck at the entire shaky edifice of post-racial America.

But lets not make Get Out sound like a PowerPoint presentation as much as anything else, it is terrific entertainment. As a horror film it is as adept at psychological chills as it is jump-scares. And, while it might not quite not fit the comedy or musical categorisation handed to it by the Golden Globes, the film is relentlessly funny, filled with the same droll humour Peele mastered in his sketch comedy days.

Most of all, it is a film made up of inerasable images: the hypnotic stirring of a silver spoon; the recurring motif of sight, be it through eyes or camera phones; and of course the loaded symbolism of the sunken place, a term that looks destined to escape its fictional trappings and recur in the wider cultural conversation. This is a film that lingered. It deserves to stay lodged in collective consciousness right through to the end of awards season.

(Buy here)

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Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/dec/20/the-50-top-films-of-2017-in-the-us-no-3-get-out

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Peter Dinklage gets yet another Emmy for his role as Tyrion Lannister

Charmaine Blake

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Peter Dinklage wins yet another Emmy for his role in ‘Game of Thrones.’

Image: hbo

Peter Dinklage won his third Emmy for most outstanding supporting actor in a drama series at the Emmys on Monday.

Dinklage, who plays the iconic Tyrion Lannister in HBO’s Game of Thrones, was nominated alongside fellow Game of Thrones actor Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, who plays his brother Jaime Lannister.

For his work as Tyrion, Dinklage has been nominated in the category seven times, winning in 2011, 2015, and now 2018.

In his acceptance speech, Dinklage thanked Coster-Waldau, who earned his first Emmy nomination for his work on Game of Thrones this year.

Hopefully both actors survive the final season of Game of Thrones coming in 2019, or at least get one more nomination next year if they do meet their demise.

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‘Green Book’ Wins Toronto Film Festival’s People’s Choice Award

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Peter Farrelly’s “Green Book” has won the Grolsch People’s Choice Award at the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival, TIFF announced at an awards ceremony on Sunday.

The film, which tells the true story of an Italian-American nightclub bouncer (Viggo Mortensen) who serves as the chauffeur for a black pianist (Mahershala Ali) on a tour through the Deep South in the early 1960s, opened at the festival on Tuesday and was an instant hit with audiences and critics, although Bradley Cooper’s “A Star Is Born” had been considered the likely winner of the People’s Choice Award.

Runners-up for the award were Barry Jenkins’ lyrical James Baldwin adaptation “If Beale Street Could Talk” and Alfonso Cuaron’s moving memory piece “Roma.”

In the past, Toronto audience members voted by depositing their ticket stubs in a box at the theater, or by using the TIFF app — festival organizers took into account the size of the theaters in which each film screened — with the films that received votes from the largest percentage of their audience winning the prizes…………………”

Read More Here: https://www.thewrap.com/green-book-wins-toronto-film-festivals-peoples-choice-award/

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Henry Cavill Out As Superman!

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Image: VCG via Getty Images

“It’s not Kryptonite that will end Henry Cavill’s run as Warner Bros.’ grimdark Superman; it’s a studio pivot.

Cavill is reportedly finished as the Man of Steel, with unnamed studio insiders telling The Hollywood Reporter that he won’t be donning the signature DC Comics superhero’s cape and tights again. It’s said to be part of a larger move aimed at fixing WB’s flagging DC Extended Universe (DCEU).

The rumored exit apparently started with a much smaller disagreement: The studio wanted Cavill for a cameo in the upcoming Shazam!, out April 5, 2019. But talks between WB and the actor’s reps didn’t go anywhere.

Beyond that, the studio also understands that bigger changes are needed. To date, the only universally successful DC-pegged release was 2017’s Wonder Woman, which landed both with critics and at the box office.

As one insider said, “There’s a recognition that some parts of the previous movies didn’t work.” (LOL at that understatement.) So now, WB is trying to hit “reset” (per another source) on the whole endeavor.

That reset reportedly includes a shift in focus from Superman to Supergirl. That movie would serve as an origin story, starring a teenage hero………………….”

Read more: https://mashable.com/article/superman-henry-cavill-is-out/

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