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The Best Films of 2018 So Far

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The very best of 2018, from Black Panther rewriting the rules for superheroes, Gary Oldman going to war as Churchill, and Maxine Peake blazing her way through 70s sexism

All the Money in the World

“Raucous thriller about the real-life 1973 kidnapping of J Paul Gettys grandson, and the billionaires subsequent refusal to pay the ransom a film that became notorious in its own right after reshooting scenes featuring disgraced actor Kevin Spacey.

What we said: With the help of Plummers tremendous villain-autocrat performance, Ridley Scott gives us a very entertaining parable about money and what it cant buy.

Read the full review.

Avengers: Infinity War

Third in the powerhouse Marvel series, bringing together a whole gallery of comic-book characters including Doctor Stranger, Iron Man and Black Panther for an epic showdown with supervillain Thanos.

What we said: Colossal, cataclysmic, delirious, preposterous and always surreally entertaining in the now well-established Marvel movie tradition.

Read the full review.

BPM: 120 Beats per Minute

Eighties-set account of the Act-Up protest movement in France, which took on the medical and political establishment over the Aids crisis with guerrilla campaigns and direct action.

What we said: A passionately acted ensemble movie [that] compellingly combines elegy, tragedy, urgency and a defiant euphoria.

Read the full review.

Beast

Jessie
Subtle drama Jessie Buckley and Johnny Flynn in Beast. Photograph: Bac Films/Moviestore/Rex/Shutterstock

Creepy, Jersey-set thriller starring Johnny Flynn as a poacher who may or may not be a serial murderer and Jessie Buckley as the unhappy young woman who falls in love with him.

What we said: Beast is a title which might appear to promise horror or melodrama and there is a little of both. But there is always something subtler going on.

Read the full review.

Black Panther

Director Ryan Cooglers film adaptation of Marvels comic book seamlessly combines action-adventure and superhero fantasy with questions of racial discrimination and power.

What we said: The intriguing thing about Black Panther is that it doesnt look like a superhero film more a wide-eyed fantasy romance: exciting, subversive and funny……”

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/jun/19/best-films-of-2018-so-far-best-movies-of-year

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Emily Blunt on the pressure of playing Mary Poppins

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Mary Poppins is a woman with a talent for putting things back together again.

“Which is why it’s rather apt that after 50 years, she’s returning to our screens at a time when the world is arguably most in need of being put back together.

And, Emily Blunt — who plays Mary Poppins in the upcoming sequel Mary Poppins Returns — is well aware of the impact her character has already had on the lives of those who watched the 1964 movie starring Julie Andrews.

Standing in full Edwardian get-up inside Shepperton Studios, Blunt told Mashable that she has fond memories of watching the film as a child. “The film, for me, and I think for most people, is one of those films that is seared into people’s memory, an emblem of their nostalgia in many ways,” says Blunt…………………………………………………”

Read more: https://mashable.com/article/emily-blunt-interview-mary-poppins-returns/

 

 

Director Rob Marshall and Emily Blunt on the set of Disney’s ‘Mary Poppins Returns’.

Image: Jay Maidment

 

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How Willem Dafoe Learned to Paint like Van Gogh

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Midway through artist-director Julian Schnabel’s new film At Eternity’s Gate, we see Vincent van Gogh, portrayed by actor Willem Dafoe, entirely consumed by the compulsion to paint. In the scene, the Dutch artist opens the door to his yellow-walled apartment in Arles, France, to find his friend, fellow artist Paul Guguin, sketching Madame Ginoux, a local café owner. Instantly compelled by what he sees, Van Gogh lunges into action, assembling his easel and grasping several paintbrushes in his left hand, while using his right to commit bold, feverish brushstrokes to canvas. His passion is enthralling—so much so, we forget that Dafoe is not a real painter at all.

At Eternity’s Gate envisions the final years of Van Gogh’s life, through a series of vignettes that straddle truth and fiction (much, though not all, is based on the trove of letters the artist left behind). We see his plight as an artist in Paris, his infatuation with the light and landscapes of Arles, and his declining mental health—including when he famously cut off his ear. But it’s not a straightforward account. “This isn’t a biopic, it doesn’t explain his life,” Dafoe recently explained at the New York Film Festival. “It’s really about painting.” Indeed, it is, first and foremost, the story of a painter as told by a painter: Schnabel, who is known for an idiosyncratic painting practice ranging from canvases covered in shattered plates to inkjet prints painted with purple-hued goats…………………………….”

Read the rest of the article here: https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-willem-dafoe-learned-paint-van-gogh

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‘Love Actually’ turns 15: Fun facts about the movie

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